Tag Archives: Indie Publishing

EDITING 101: 04 – Character Name Consistency…

In Part 4 of Susan Uttendorfsky’s wonderful series on editing, we learn about Character Name Consistency and the benefit of using spreadsheets to keep track of character names, etc. while we’re writing…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Originally posted as the Dun Writin’—Now Whut? series on this blog, EDITING 101 is a weekly refresher series for some of you and brand new for others.

Courtesy of Adirondack Editing

Character Name Consistency

A book I edited had a main character with a name of, say, Paul Charleston, who was a vice president of marketing. Within the first fifty pages, the author had referred to this one character by:

Paul

Paulie

Paulie-Wallie

Mr. Charleston

Paulie C.

Mr. C.

Mr. VP

Mr. Veep

the vice president

the veep

Mr. Marketing

and probably ten others I haven’t remembered. Imagine how confused a reader would have been, as there was no discernible reason for the name changes. In addition, should the author have decided midway to change this character’s name, it would have been impossible to change them all with a simple Find/Replace operation. The risk of missing one—or more than one—was very…

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EDITING 101: 03 – THAT’s the Problem in Revising…

Editing can be a nightmare! But Susan Uttendorfsky takes some of the fright out of it in Part 3 of her incredible Editing 101 series on The Story Reading Ape’s blog. A big thank you to both Chris and Susan for hosting and sharing 🙂

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Originally posted as the Dun Writin’—Now Whut? series on this blog, EDITING 101 is a weekly refresher series for some of you and brand new for others.

Courtesy of Adirondack Editing

THAT’s the Problem in Revising

What’s the problem?”

That’s the problem.”

What?”

That.”

I don’t get it.”

That’s the problem.”

Sound like the old “Who’s on first” routine? Extraneous words that make a writer’s work bulky need to be eliminated. But how can you eliminate words that you don’t even see? That’s the problem, and that is one of those words that can usually be cut. Dialogue that is casual regularly contains many incidences of that word, but when it comes to writing, that can usually be deleted.

Are you still confused? If a sentence is understandable without “that” in it, take it out.

Example: “She told him that she was leaving” reads just fine…

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Pendulum Type Action – Guest Post…

A delightful guest post on The Story Reading Ape’s blog by Craig Boyack on writing short-form fiction…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Thanks to The Story Reading Ape for this incredible opportunity to run four monthly articles on his website. The big question is what exactly to use this space for. Quite honestly, I do want people to buy my books, but I am the brand and will stick with that for a few paragraphs.

One of my great loves is short form fiction. These can be micro-fiction, short stories, even novellas. I grew up reading these, and was saddened when they nearly died out.

In hindsight it’s easy to see. Short form was the preference of magazines and newspapers. If you look back far enough some of our classic fiction came from those media, and not what we call novels. Sherlock Holmes came to light this way.

When the Internet took control of our lives, most of the paper media faded away. We get our news online, or on television. Magazines…

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Guest Post: Finding that book inside you

Ari Meghlen hosts the inspirational Sally Cronin, who offers superb advice on breaking into publishing through writing non-fiction. A must-read for new as well as veteran authors…

This week’s guest post is by the lovely Sally Cronin who is discussing the option of writing Non-Fiction books.

sallyFinding that book inside youby Sally Cronin

Not everyone can dive into publishing with a best-selling novel, and most successful authors who have sold a million copies of their books are a rare breed.

Writing and then marketing our own books can be exciting but it can also be a daunting task. Whilst most of us who write love the process, we understand that we are competing with hundreds of thousands of other fiction titles that are published each year. This is particularly true if you are writing within one of the most popular of the genres such as Thrillers, Mystery or Fantasy.

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4 Top Tips For Self-Publishing Your First Book With @Pokercubster

Debby Gies  is a master of many things, not the least of which is indie publishing. Head over to Sacha Black’s blog to read Debby’s excellent guest post and garner some very important tips on editing and formatting your manuscript, writing your book blurb, and developing your cover…

Sacha Black

Self pub tipsWriters have a shit load of decisions to make:

Who to kill today, knife em or hang em, daily word count totals, book prices, whether to drown your book blurbing sorrows with vodka or wine… the list goes on.

But one of the biggest of all decisions of all is whether you’re going to run the rat race to traditional publishing, or  push the shiny red button yourself and claim the indie badge.

I made my decision. My blood runs thick with indie colours.

Publishers have their place, I’ll never see my books in a store *weeps* but that sure as shit ain’t enough of a reason for me to go begging book in hand to their doorstep.

Maybe there will come a time when I might need them and I’ll wander up tail between my word covered thighs. But I haven’t slaved over my book for two sodding years, only to be told…

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EDITING 101: 02 – Description Depression…

Susan Uttendorfsky brings us her second great article in her Editing 101 series on The Story Reading Ape’s blog: How and why not to over or under describe scenes and characters…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Originally posted as the Dun Writin’—Now Whut? series on this blog, EDITING 101 is a weekly refresher series for some of you and brand new for others.

Courtesy of Adirondack Editing

 Do You Have Description Depression?

Are you a writer who uses rich, lush descriptions for their settings and characters? Or one who just wants “the facts, Ma’am, just the facts”? Is it an effort to decide how much description to use, where, and exactly what?

If you struggle with Description Depression in your writing, you’re not alone. There isn’t a “correct” way to use description in fiction, although, in my humble opinion, you’re better off using too little than too much.

In over describing, a writer runs the risk of annoying their readers. Many readers admit to skipping over large amounts of description. It didn’t used to be that way. Before the age of movies, television, the Internet, and smartphones…

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EDITING 101: 01 – Introduction and ‘Redundancies’…

AUTHORS: Christopher Graham is hosting Susan Uttendorfsky on his blog, who is offering a series of posts on editing. Susan has decades of experience, and the series is interactive. Don’t miss this!

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Introduction

Originally posted as the Dun Writin’—Now Whut? series on this blog, EDITING 101 is a weekly refresher series for some of you and brand new for others.

Courtesy of Adirondack Editing

logo-adk-editing

Owned by Susan Uttendorfsky

Susan UttendorfskyFor those who have not yet met me, I’m a freelance copy editor living in upstate New York near the Adirondacks. I’ve been writing and editing for over thirty years, and freelancing for the past few years.

I work almost exclusively with independent authors.

A few submit their manuscripts to agents and publishers, but by the time they come to me, most have decided to self-publish.

So what are we going to talk about in this series? Chris and I are of the same mind when it comes to offering information to writers—we want you to learn how to be a good author. So I’ll be sharing wisdom on

  • Self-editing

  • Revising

  • English usage tips

  • Helpful resources

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