Category Archives: Author Resources

EDITING 101: 18 – Writer’s Block…

Susan Uttendorfsky brings us Part 18 of her Editing 101 series on The Story Reading Ape. The focus is writer’s block, and she lists 14 ways to attempt breaking through. I love it when an editor helps the harried writer hike the hurdles.  🙂

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Originally posted as the Dun Writin’—Now Whut? series on this blog, EDITING 101 is a weekly refresher series for some of you and brand new for others.

Courtesy of Adirondack Editing

Writer’s Block

Ok, so maybe you’re not quite done writing. Maybe you’re stuck. Horribly stuck, and you have no idea where to go next in your book. You are so completely, terribly, frantically stuck that you can’t even write a darn thing! (Yes, that’s a lot of “ly” adverbs there, isn’t it?

What now?

Aha! Super Susan to the rescue. I can’t say I’ve ever been there, because I don’t do a lot of writing. But I can imagine how horrible it is, and I’ve read a lot of threads in LinkedIn writing groups talking about writer’s block. So I’ve stored up quite a few hints and ideas to get you over the hump. No, not Hump Day—that’s the Geico® camel*…

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EDITING 101: 17 – Powerful Protagonists…

Susan Uttendorfsky brings us Part 17 of her Editing 101 series on The Story Reading Ape. She discusses powerful vs. ineffective protagonists and includes links to two articles that speak of this in detail. Many parts of this series helped me immensely in writing my latest novel. If you’re an author and have missed any parts or all of this series, do yourself a favor and check it out. I’m sure you’ll find it enlightening …

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Originally posted as the Dun Writin’—Now Whut? series on this blog, EDITING 101 is a weekly refresher series for some of you and brand new for others.

Courtesy of Adirondack Editing

Powerful Protagonists

The protagonist is the chief actor, or main character, in your book. It might be a man or a woman, or even a fictional character with no gender (such as a tree). For today’s post, we’re going to refer to the protagonist as “him” for continuity’s sake.

Why is it important for your protagonist to be powerful? I don’t mean physically strong. I don’t even mean personally effective or likeable. Your protagonist may be on your readers’ hate list, but perhaps they have a grudging respect for him. I’m talking about powerful in terms of making an impact with your readers. A main character who doesn’t make an impact with your readers is going to lead you down the…

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EDITING 101: 16 – Homonyms, Homographs, and Homophones…

Susan Uttendorfsky brings us Part 16 of her Editing 101 series on The Story Reading Ape. She discusses homonyms, homographs, and homophones, the latter of which can be a challenge for writers …

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Originally posted as the Dun Writin’—Now Whut? series on this blog, EDITING 101 is a weekly refresher series for some of you and brand new for others.

Courtesy of Adirondack Editing

Homonyms, Homographs, and Homophones

I had a lot of fun researching today’s post. (Yes, I’m an über-geek, but let’s just keep this to ourselves, shall we?) You may be wondering what these words are (and how in the world they pertain to writing), but you’ll be surprised once I define them. I’m sure you know exactly what they are; you just don’t know the official words for them. And we’re only interested in one when it comes to writing and editing.

Homonyms are words with the same spelling and the same pronunciation, but they have different meanings:

  • bear (animal) and bear (tolerate)

  • rose (flower) and rose (past tense of “rise”)

  • spruce up a room and a spruce tree

See? You knew…

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This Is How to Monetize Your Knowledge and Make Money Blogging

Janice Wald posted an outstanding article on her blog today, detailing the successful elements of blog monetization. Topics include content marketing, growing our readership, and writing a compelling CTA or call to action. Janice’s new book, An Insider’s Guide to Building a Successful Blog, is jam-packed with tips on how to engage readers, increase blog traffic, and much more. This post is a plethora of information that made me realize monetizing a blog is not difficult; it merely requires focus, intention, and tenacity …

Monetize your blog, tips from an expert #BlogMonetization #ContentMarketing

Do you want to know why most blogs fail, abandoned by their owners between three and nine months?

I’m sure you have many theories.

Lack of readers, lack of subscribers, lack of patience to wait for the readers and subscribers, and lack of time are likely causes.

However, according to successful blogger Minuca Elena, the reason most blogs fail has nothing to do with any of those things.

In a recent interview, Minuca explained that the reason most blogs fail is the blog owner has no idea how to make money blogging, also called blog monetization.

My recent content marketing post about how to monetize your blog was met with controversy.

For example, Gilly Madison responded that bloggers fall into two categories, those wishing to make money and those not wishing to monetize. I beg to differ. I believe there is a third category of bloggers– those who might want to monetize one day.

This post will offer two ways you can monetize should the desire to make money blogging ever come.

Fortunately, publisher Lois Hoffman is here to explain how you can make money writing on the Internet.

Lois’s forte is helping writers monetize, so she is an expert in this field.

Are You a Blogger Looking to Monetize Your Knowledge?

For many bloggers, writing is simply a creative pursuit. It’s a way to share what you know or what you’re experiencing and be part of a vibrant blogging community. But if you’re looking to your blog as a source of income, it’s important to think more strategically about your content marketing strategy. It’s not just about getting visitors to your site. Content marketing (or authority marketing) is about generating leads and then driving sales from your traffic.

What is Content Marketing?

The Content Marketing Institute describes content marketing like this:

Content marketing is a strategic marketing approach focused on creating and distributing valuable, relevant, and consistent content to attract and retain a clearly-defined audience — and, ultimately, to drive profitable customer action.

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Guest author Janice Wald, Mostlyblogging.com, Book promotion, Content writing, Blogging, D.G. Kaye

Who Has a New Book? – Informative Blogging Guru -Janice Wald

On her Friday book post, Debby Gies interviewed Janice Wald,  a woman I consider The Guru of Blogging. Janice talks about her book – An Insider’s Guide to Building a Successful Blog – and shares a few tips on networking as well as starting, running, and growing a blog. She is a wealth of information. If you have a blog and would like to increase your traffic and grow your readership, Janice is your go-to person. Don’t miss this outstanding post!

who-has-a-new-book-debby

Source: Guest author Janice Wald, Mostlyblogging.com, Book promotion, Content writing, Blogging, D.G. Kaye

Today I’m excited to introduce “Ninja Networker”, pro blogger and now author Janice Wald with her debut book – An Insider’s Guide to Building a Successful Blog 

janice-wald

Janice runs her blog, MostlyBlogging.com and for those who aren’t familiar with her blog, you’re in for a treat! Janice’s blog is a wealth of information for writers and bloggers alike. She shares everything you could possibly want to know about starting, running, and growing a blog, from SEO to Apps, to how to effectively use social media. It’s no surprise that Janice is also a Blogging Coach and offers services for hire.

Janice decided to compile her goldmine of information and put it into a book. I’ve been following Janice for almost 2 years now and can’t wait to sink my eyes into her book. I could see by just checking the ‘Look Inside’ on Amazon, and the contents that this book is a must have ‘bible’ for all bloggers to up their game. Not to mention, I was FLOORED when I found my own name and website listed in one of her chapters ‘71 Tips that Will Make Your Blog Successful’.

About Janice:

Wald’s blog, Mostly Blogging, is included in

In addition, Wald was also the featured blogger in an expert interview series, Janice Wald of Mostly Blogging on How to Make Blogs Better

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EDITING 101: 14 – Self-Editing Part 2…

In Part 14 of her Editing 101 series on The Story Reading Ape, Susan Uttendorfsky brings us Part 2 of Self-Editing. She discusses proper and improper usage of semi-colons and commas. Consider these examples: Woman without her man is nothing; Woman, without her man, is nothing; Woman, without her, man is nothing. Hop over to Chris’ blog and enjoy the fascination of punctuation 🙂

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Originally posted as the Dun Writin’—Now Whut? series on this blog, EDITING 101 is a weekly refresher series for some of you and brand new for others.

Courtesy of Adirondack Editing

Self-Editing Part 2

Last week in Self-Editing Part 1 we talked about some specific tasks that can be done while self-editing.

Today we’re going to talk about tasks involving grammar.

Grammar was developed to make writing understandable since you’re not there to correct any misunderstandings.

Your writing needs to stand on its own two feet!

  1. Using commas properly. The first use of the comma is to replace the word “and.”

  • I went to the store and bought apples and pears and bread and milk.

  • I went to the store, buying apples, pears, bread, and milk.

The first example is not wrong, but the excessive use of the word “and” makes it hard to read. A comma is generally not used…

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EDITING 101: 13 – Self-Editing Part 1…

In Part 13 of her Editing 101 series on The Story Reading Ape, Susan Uttendorfsky presents Part 1 of self-editing. She discusses searching for weak verbs and overused words, and how to vary sentence constructions. As I’m finalizing my manuscript and preparing to publish my next novel, this series has been extremely helpful. I’m sure you’ll find it helpful as well …

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Originally posted as the Dun Writin’—Now Whut? series on this blog, EDITING 101 is a weekly refresher series for some of you and brand new for others.

Courtesy of Adirondack Editing

Self Editing Part 1

Some of the things we’ve discussed previously are good to be on the watch for and remove, but there are other, specific tasks that can be done when a manuscript’s completed to help polish it. Since there are many of these odd jobs, this specific post will continue over time.

Editing your own work involves hard labor. Other authors have mentioned they make as many as ten to fifteen passes in editing, revising, and reworking, focusing on one or two aspects of self-editing each time. Those authors are to be commended, since writing a book is only one third of the work. Editing is the second third, and publishing and marketing take up the final third. You’re…

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EDITING 101: 12 – Directions and Impossibilities…

In Part 12 of her Editing 101 series, Susan Uttendorfsky covers directional redundancies and impossible actions. Do we stand up or do we stand? Do we throw our eyes across the room or do we throw someone a scathing glance? Hop over to The Story Reading Ape to read this enlightening post . . .

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Originally posted as the Dun Writin’—Now Whut? series on this blog, EDITING 101 is a weekly refresher series for some of you and brand new for others.

Courtesy of Adirondack Editing

Directions and Impossibilities

Welcome to today’s article! I hope you’re keeping busy and life is not getting in the way of your writing schedule too much.

We’re going to talk about two short items today. The first is directional redundancies. It’s a big term, isn’t it? It was covered briefly in EDITING 101: 01, Redundancies, but I wanted to go a little further with it. In the previous article, one of the examples was “Her tears ran down her cheeks,” and I pointed out that tears can only run in one direction, can’t they? When was the last time you ever saw somebody’s tears run up their cheeks? (Perhaps if they were hanging upside down on a jungle gym, but…

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EDITING 101: 11 – Using a Thesaurus…

Susan Uttendorfsky brings us Part 11 of her Editing 101 series on The Story Reading Ape: Using a Thesaurus. Do you want your writing to sound colorful or pompous? Hop over to Chris Graham’s blog for the details…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Originally posted as the Dun Writin’—Now Whut? series on this blog, EDITING 101 is a weekly refresher series for some of you and brand new for others.

Courtesy of Adirondack Editing

Using a Thesaurus

When you were in grammar school, you were taught the terms antonym and synonym. An antonym is a word that means the opposite of another word: love/hate, hot/cold, spring/fall, light/dark. Synonyms are words meaning the same thing (or nearly the same thing): light/bright, traitor/Benedict Arnold, flat/horizontal, soft/cushiony. A thesaurus is a book which lists synonyms for many words and can come in very handy for a writer. The first one you were exposed to was probably Roget’s Thesaurus. The one I like to use is the Oxford American Writer’s Thesaurus. If you don’t want to use a book, there are online thesauri, such as http://www.thesaurus.com and http://freethesaurus.net/. Microsoft Word has a built-in thesaurus. You can…

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EDITING 101: 10 – What Happens When You Die? – NOT in a Metaphysical sense…

In Part 10 of her Editing 101 series on The Story Reading Ape, Susan Uttendorfsky discuses the need for authors to plan for how they want their intellectual property handled in the event of their death..

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Originally posted as the Dun Writin’—Now Whut? series on this blog, EDITING 101 is a weekly refresher series for some of you and brand new for others.

Courtesy of Adirondack Editing

What Happens When You Die?

Wait, wait, don’t run away.

This is not a religious post.

This is a practical, necessary discussion about your writing, your books, your accounts, etc., when you bite the dust.

It’s going to happen to all of us, sooner or later, and writers have additional details to worry about—or their heirs and estates, if the writers don’t address it. What happens to your copyright? What happens to your accounts? Who can keep selling your books? There are lots of questions to answer, and it’s best if you think about it ahead of time. You’ve learned a lot through your journey of writing, publishing, and marketing. How many years did it take you to get where you…

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