Category Archives: Book Reviews

#5-Star #Review for #Plateau

While I was on break helping my sisters with my mother, my book PLATEAU received two new reviews. Since I haven’t developed the habit of checking my books for reviews (I know! What kind of author am I?), I stumbled upon these at different times.

I reblogged Colleen Chesebro‘s review on 10/5/17. You can read it HERE. I just learned of Madelyn Griffith-Hayne‘s review, and would like to share it with you now. 

Madelyn is a practicing ADD Coach who trains, mentors, and coaches ADD professionals. She refers to herself as The ADD Poster Girl and describes herself in this way: “Mentalist and empath, visionary and myopic, the sanest person I’ve ever met with the craziest life: a self-aware, self-assured stuttering wonder of more-than-a-mess.” That alone should kindle your little grey cells 🙂 If you’re not familiar with Madelyn, please visit her BLOG, comment, and share. 

Madelyn has captured the essence of PLATEAU. Thank you, my friend, for this heartfelt and moving review ❤ PLATEAU by Tina Frisco

Spiritually Moving and Uplifting

FIRST I must say that I loved this gentle little book. I devoured it in a single evening, so entranced by the story that I didn’t want to stop to read the inspiring quotes from Lynn V. Andrew’s Power Deck that began each chapter. Once I reached the end of the book I had to go back for the quotes, skimming each following chapter a second time.

NOW I must say that I have struggled with how I could possibly write a review — I’ve never read another book quite like it.

Other reviewers here have given you as much as you need to become familiar with the book’s “environment” – if I can call it that, introducing you to a few of the characters – so I won’t repeat similar content. But they can’t convey the deeply spiritual, uplifting essence of the book that, to me, is what makes it remarkable. Plateau never pontificates, but rather seduces the reader to come to his or her own spiritual realizations as the story unfolds.

I suppose the most impactful thing I can say is that I was infused with a sense of well-being when I finally put down my Kindle and turned off the light. I was in such a calm and totally relaxed positive state of mind that I transitioned easily and almost immediately into a deep sleep – a rare experience in my life.
xx,
mgh
(Madelyn Griffith-Haynie – ADDandSoMuchMORE dot com)
ADD/EFD Coach Training Field founder; ADD Coaching co-founder
“It takes a village to transform a world!”

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Colleen’s #Book #Reviews ~ 5 Stars for Plateau

Colleen Chesebro gave me the most wonderful ‘welcome home’ gift by featuring her review of my book, PLATEAU, on her blog. It’s always a thrill when our books receive positive reviews, especially when they touch our hearts.

If you’re not familiar with Colleen, do visit and follow her wonderful blogs ~ The Fairy Whisperer and A Mindful JourneyI’m sure you’ll be delighted.

Thank you, Colleen. You are a sister and a friend. My heart to your heart ❤❤

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PLATEAU by Tina Frisco

  • Title:  Plateau: Beyond the Trees
  • Amazon Author Profile: Tina Frisco
  • File Size: 1474 KB
  • Print Length: 176 Pages
  • Publisher: Tina Frisco, 2nd Edition
  • Publication Date: July 11, 2017
  • Sold By: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B073W789GB
  • ISBN-10: 1548771783
  • ISBN-13: 978-1548771782
  • Formats: Paperback and Kindle
  • Goodreads
  • Genres: Science Fiction, Fantasy, Metaphysical, Visionary

IN THE AUTHOR’S WORDS:

Is there any hope for humankind? Will love prevail over fear? A young tribal female is unaware she holds the answers to these questions. W’Hyani was born strong and willful and the Keeper of the Crystal Heart. Her mettle is tested by the cosmic forces that shaped her destiny. She comes face-to-face with fear in a battle that would shrink the will of the most daring warrior. The fate of all beings in the Universe depends on her defeating the bloodthirsty gondrah and unlocking the mystery of the Great Mosaic of Life.

MY RECOMMENDATION:

At the first turn of page one in the Plateau: Beyond the Trees, the reader steps back into time, or possibly the future, to meet the E’Ghali tribe and the young, W’Hyani. The story is told through her experiences and life journey as W’Hyani embarks on a hero’s journey fraught with all the hardships and heartbreaks that life can bring. Yet, somehow the lessons she learns come across as fresh and new leading her on the path to illumination.

At the core of the story is the legend of the sacred cave of the E’Ghali where the Great Mosaic represents the Great One. W’hyani and her parents hold the key to this mystery as they grapple with their destinies. Each family member holds a special place in the fulfillment of W’Hyani’s destiny.

At times, travelers from “the city” ventured onto E’Ghali land and relationships were established. When this happened, I couldn’t quite tell if we were in the future or the past. It didn’t really matter because the tribal legends spoke of a time when humans would be able to exist in peace and love which left me with the feeling that this event would soon take place. When this event occurs is not the point. Instead, it is the fact that it will happen that captures your spirit.

Such is W’Hyani’s destiny as the Keeper of the Crystal Heart. She represents hope and the future of all mankind.

At the beginning of each chapter, the author shares a quote from Lynn V. Andrew’s, The Power Deck. Each of these quotes drove home a powerful message that was highlighted by W’Hyani’s particular journey in that chapter. I was deeply moved by many of these passages which were a great addition to the story.

Plateau was an emotional read for me. I took my time and tried to experience through my reading, the life lessons that W’Hyani and her friends undertook. Their experiences caused me to reflect upon my own life and spiritual journey. This is the kind of book that transports you to a higher plane of existence where what you thought was the ending is really only the beginning.

Tina Frisco wrote this book as an outreach of hope to the doomsday messages that swirled in the media around December 21, 2012. In reality, the book is timeless. The message of love, understanding, and compassion resonate today or any day. Respect for our mother Earth reverberates lovingly through each page.

I’ve added this book to my Me Time Category for Spirituality because of the emotional impact this book left on my heart. I’ve never read another story like it and found it to be a hidden gem in the literary world.

MY RATING:

Character Believability: 5
Flow and Pace: 5
Reader Engagement: 5
Reader Enrichment: 5
Reader Enjoyment: 5
Overall Rate:  5 out of 5 Fairies

Continue reading… 

Return and Reviews

I’m happy to return from my blogging break and report that my mother has recovered and is progressing well. My heartfelt thank you to those who kept in touch with emails and messages. Love is the backbone of existence, and I’m so grateful for its presence in my life.

I’m still in catch-up mode, so it will take me a few days to get back in sync with visiting your lovely blogs and dealing with my social network pages. The nearly 700 emails that greeted me have slowed me down a bit 🙂

Although I had no time to be online and visit blogs during my break, I did read and review several books while traveling cross-country by train. I found all of them delightful, compelling, and enlightening. I can’t think of a better way to re-enter the blogging world than by featuring the following reviews.

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YELLOW HAIR by Andrew Joyce  Yellow Hair by Andrew Joyce
My 5-Star Review
A Native Truth Unveiled

In this gripping historical novel, Andrew Joyce threads the fictitious tale of a White man’s life-changing events through the factual tapestry of the devastation suffered by the Plains Indians at the hands of the American government. The White man is Jacob Ariesen, who becomes known as Hin Zi or Yellow Hair.

It is Spring of 1850 in North America. Imagine you are a member of a wagon train of one hundred and forty-four White people going West in search of a better life. You encounter overwhelming hardship and are rescued by Indians. You are treated well and with respect.

Now imagine you are a Plains Indian. Soldiers invade your land at the behest of their government. They do not ask your permission. They do not treat you with respect. They look upon your people as savages and presume all you hold dear is theirs for the taking. They force you to sign their treaties, by which they trick you into selling acre after acre of your land in exchange for gold. You tell them you have no use of the yellow metal, but they deceive you into trusting you can use it to barter for horses, tools, food, and other necessities. They employ deception time and again when their Congress rewrites the treaties – without your knowledge or consent – and drastically cuts the agreed-to purchase price. They literally steal your land, upon which soldiers build forts and settlers build houses. The Wasichus (Whites) trap and hunt indigenous wildlife into near extinction, forcing you to become dependent on the American government for your very existence. You once were proud, fierce, and free. You now are demoralized, displaced, and angry.

In this sober and eye-opening tale, Joyce strips away the facade of righteousness brandished by White military and political figures, people whose names appear dominant in American history. He lays bare the greed and fear that fueled their ignorant beliefs and heinous deeds, not the least of which was the bloody slaughter and mutilation of women, children, and old ones.

Noted Native American figures, presented as one-dimensional savage people in White history books, become fully developed animated characters under the pen of Andrew Joyce. They jump off the page, grab and captivate the reader. Among these are Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse, who pull us into their world and show us first-hand the effects of severe hardship coupled with dehumanization.

This was the perfect book to read while traveling across the United States by train and following the Colorado River for 230-plus miles. I imagined covered wagons caught in deadly currents that drowned all life forms as they carried them downriver. I imagined the battle at Wounded Knee Creek. I imagined the Battle of the Little Bighorn fought on the banks of the river that lent its name to this historical event. But most of all, as the train moved through mountain gorges and territories not traversed by automobile or person, I imagined a time when life was lived by the seasons, close to Mother Earth. My heart broke as distant memories of such a life played across my mind like a slide show.

This book is a page-turner that kept me glued from beginning to end. It is very well-written and chock-full of engaging characters, be they honorable or deplorable. I appreciated the humor Joyce attributed to the Indians, which he sprinkled throughout the novel. This added an inherent humanizing dimension to the indigenous peoples of whom Americans learn so little in school.

I also appreciated that the author intermittently but consistently focused on Native American spiritual beliefs. My favorite line was: “It is a good day to die.” In what way is that spiritual? you ask. Well… You’ll just have to read the book and figure it out for yourself. Hoka hey!

P.S. I FORGIVE YOU by D.G. Kaye P.S. I Forgive You by D.G. Kaye
My 5-Star Review
A Courageous Revealing

Parenthood does not come with a user manual. Children learn parenting skills from the adults in their lives. They generally emulate what they see and experience. If their lifelong experience is a negative one, they might be inclined to perpetuate it. But this does not have to be so.

In her compelling memoir, P.S. I Forgive You, D.G. Kaye reveals the habitual neglect and abuse she and her siblings suffered at the hands of an envious, threatening, narcissistic, and deceitful mother.

It takes courage, strength, and determination to prevail over hardship, especially when it is a constant in childhood; especially when a parent perpetrates neglect and abuse. But it is not impossible to overcome adversity when one focuses their intention.

Kaye shows us how to take the energy consumed by feeling mistreated, hurt, fearful, and guilty, and instead make it work for us by directing that energy toward building self-esteem, fortitude, and positive intention. She tells us how she reacted as a child, and then shows us how, as an adult, she turned a negative into a positive. Acceptance, compassion, and forgiveness are major players in this scenario, a dynamic that tested the author’s resilience, challenged her conscience, and ultimately allowed her to triumph over the all-consuming adverse conditioning perpetrated by her demanding narcissistic mother.

I highly recommend this book to anyone whose childhood was hijacked by a neglectful and abusive parent, and who would like to learn how to break free and live a happy healthy life.

SAM: A SHAGGY DOG STORY by Sally Cronin
My 5-Star Review
Do You Speak Dog?
Sally Cronin

Sam: A Shaggy Dog Story is one of the most delightful books I have ever read. Sally Cronin gives her Rough Collie a voice, allowing him to narrate his own tale.

A few of the things Sam tells us about are his friends (cat, dog, and human alike), his favorite things (sausages, cheese, ice cream, snow), his job as security consultant, car rides while singing along with Sally, and walks along the beach.

Sam is very observant and intelligent. He learns to understand both cat and human vocal sounds. He also learns to speak a few human words! Mawgh is more; heyoo is hello; and Orh, Ee, Va is Oliver. ‘More’ and ‘Oliver’ are interchangeable, as they both indicate he would like ‘mawgh’ of a delicious treat he had just enjoyed.

Sam’s introduction to cats is very positive. When he is still a puppy, Sally and her husband David – the alpha humans in Sam’s pack – adopt a feral cat whom they dub ‘Henry.’ Henry teaches Sam many worthy things about life, and they become great friends. Also, a feral mama cat has kittens on Sam’s property, and he dubs himself their guardian. These experiences prepare Sam for when Sally brings home two kittens. He readily steps up to the plate, nurturing and protecting them.

Sam’s story is heartwarming and humorous, sure to amuse and delight adults as well as children. I read this book in one sitting and was disappointed when it ended. I wanted more, and so will you.

What I appreciated most about Sam’s story is that it leaves the reader with a heightened respect for nonhuman animals. They think and feel as we do; and anyone who thinks otherwise will be hard-pressed to hold on to that opinion after meeting Sam. I would like to see this book offered for sale through animal rights and humane organizations around the world. And for me, that is the highest praise…

ON TRYANNY by Timothy Snyder 
My 5-Star Review
“It can’t happen here.”

In his eye-opening book, On Tyranny, Timothy Snyder draws parallels between Nazism/Fascism/Communism and what is occurring now in the United States of America. It is a small book, quickly read but packed with relevant data.

The road to tyranny can be subtle, drawing people in with false or exaggerated claims of terrorism from homeland or abroad. Real news is purported to be fake and is consistently repeated as such, gradually moving people to mistake falsehoods for truth. Free thinkers become the enemy of the State, and the exercise of free speech becomes a criminal act.

The author suggests that truth dies in four modes: (1) open hostility to verifiable reality; (2) endless repetition that makes the fictional plausible and the criminal desirable; (3) open embrace of contradiction; (4) misplaced faith. Snyder states we have witnessed all of these with the current U.S. President. (1) During the 2016 campaign, the candidate vehemently repeated lies as facts; 78% of his factual claims were found to be false. (2) Repeating “Build that wall” and “Lock her up” served to reinforce the connection between him and his followers rather than describe what he actually planned to do. (3) He promised to cut taxes and erase the national debt while also promising to increase defense spending. These promises were mutually contradictory and encouraged people to abandon reason. (4) “I alone can solve it” was a self-deifying claim that made truth “oracular rather than factual” and made “evidence” irrelevant.

Snyder details the progression to tyranny in Nazi Germany, Fascist Italy, and Communist Russia, showing how small and often subtle changes serve to lure the people, little by little, into accepting the dogma of tyranny and, thus, tyranny itself. He warns us to be wary of one-party States, paramilitaries, and dangerous language.

Entrancing words can mesmerize and entice people into blindly accepting the prelude to tyranny. Once the prelude is established, totalitarianism slides into place with ease. It would behoove those of us living in democratic countries to remain vigilant to this slippery process. Tyranny is a beast with many tentacles. We need to recognize them and prevent their institution. We need to dialogue with each other and realize that differing opinions are healthy and necessary to democracy. We need to pinch ourselves daily and remain alert to subtle changes that would erode democracy (e.g., The Patriot Act trades freedom for a false sense of safety). We need to get involved in the democratic process and not fall prey to the mistaken belief: “It can’t happen here.”

Tyranny can gain a foothold anywhere people are drawn in by a charismatic leader whom they follow blindly. In remaining alert, aware, and vigilant, we are our own best allies.

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Thank you for reading my reviews, and I’ll see you soon on your lovely blogs. The beautiful featured image is courtesy of Terri Webster Schrandt ❤

Vampyrie by Tina Frisco

I was pleasantly surprised to read Cathleen Townsend‘s lovely review of my latest novel, Vampyrie. I very much enjoyed my interview with her in May. Cathleen is the author of five novels and gives generously of her time to fellow authors.

Cathleen Townsend

VCVampyrie contains all the classic vampire lore–the fangs, silent movement, brutal attacks, and human senses that are outmatched by their unearthly antagonists. In addition to this, it also holds some unique world-building, everything from the biochemical roots of vampires to their origins. As someone who’s written seven novels retelling fairy tales, I can appreciate this. A fresh blend of old and new can be an absorbing approach.

The book opens with Phoebe, the novel’s protagonist, being abducted, and unwittingly involved in the ongoing fight between the two branches of vampires. Fortunately for her, a league exists to fight the evil, degraded vampires, although she certainly wasn’t expecting her new knowledge to involve her own family history. Nor was she prepared to find her friends were also at risk.

If you’re a fan of paranormal reads with a scientific twist, Vampyrie is a read that should appeal to you. Click here…

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#Book #Review ~ #The Little Soul and the Sun

The Little Soul and the Sun

Written by Neale Donald Walsch 
Illustrated by Frank Riccio

The Little Soul and the Sun by Neale Donald Walsch

My 5-star Review
Why Do We Do the Things We Do?

This book made me rethink my attitude toward those who commit acts of cruelty and injustice. The Little Soul and the Sun, written by Neale Donald Walsch and illustrated by Frank Riccio, tells the story of a little disincarnate soul who wants to experience the act of forgiving when she incarnates. But since everything the Creator made is perfect, there would be no one to forgive. So another little disincarnate soul offers to incarnate with her and do something really terrible, in order for her friend to experience forgiving. When asked why she would be willing to behave despicably, the friend replies, “I would do it because I love you.”
I’ve owned this book since its publication in 1998 and have reread it many times over the years. The recent chaos and unrest in the United States and around the world has moved me to read it once again. And my heart soared. There are many ways to respond to heartless injustice and despicable acts of cruelty. We can react in anger, close and fill our hearts with hatred, and forget who we truly are. Or we can keep our hearts open, move into gratitude, rise above the chaos, and engage in meaningful nonviolent action in an attempt to right the wrong.
If in fact we do make contracts with the Creator and other souls before we incarnate, everything that plays out here on Mother Earth is a lesson we chose to learn and an experience we wished to have. Both the act of cruelty and the remedial action are opportunities for growth. If the contract involves two-way action, then the remedial action must be carried out, lest the contract become null and void.
Given the Earth is a bipolar planet ~ coupled with the law of physics: all matter converts to energy ~ we can infer that our lessons will be of a bipolar nature.
Darkness defines the light.
Evil defines good.
This book touches me deeply every time I read it. I think it no accident that it’s beautifully illustrated and designed as a children’s book; for in order to change attitudes and behavior cultivated over a lifetime, we must speak to the child within. I am grateful to Mr. Walsch and Mr. Riccio for the enlightening pearl of wisdom they have given us ❤

#Book Review – #Better Blogging with Photography by Terri Webster Schrandt

Terri Webster SchrandtAlthough I don’t own a smart phone or digital camera (yet!), I’m very interested in photography for many reasons, not the least of which is to generate my own photos for use on my blog. I’m so impressed by Terri Webster Schrandt‘s book, Better Blogging with Photography, that a digital camera has just moved to the top of my Absolutely Have to Purchase bucket list! Read on and learn why… 

Purchase Better Blogging with Photography  HERE 

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My 5-Star Review  

Better Blogging with Photography by Terri Webster Schrandt

A Gem of a Little Guidebook 

If you’re considering using photos on your blog to generate readership/sales, or simply to make your website more attractive and appealing, reading this book will ignite your enthusiasm and give you the tools needed to begin. 

Terri Webster Schrandt has condensed her knowledge of photography and blogging into a terrific little resource guide. Better Blogging with Photography  outlines how to upload print copies of photos, take and curate photos using a mobile phone or digital camera, and acquire photos from contacts or garner them from the Internet. Included are websites that offer free images, and the author wisely cautions to always check the rights and restrictions for each image. She also describes how to edit your photos and suggests downloadable software that’s either free or at minimal cost. An added perk is the chapter on links and resources. 

Schrandt has managed to encapsulate the basics of her subject matter into a 50-page comprehensive guidebook. Whether you’re new to blogging or well-seasoned, Better Blogging with Photography  will set you on the right track to enhancing the appearance of your website and increasing your readership. I highly recommend this book. 

Terri Webster Schrandt’s Links:  Website/Blog   Amazon   Facebook   Twitter   LinkedIn   Google+

#Book Review – #Meno-What? by D.G. Kaye

D.G. Kaye WriterAs I read  D.G. Kaye‘s memoir, Meno-What?  my mind flooded with images of the hilariously popular Carol Burnett Show. I saw Carol Burnett and Vickie Lawrence spoofing all the physical and emotional changes a woman can expect upon reaching menopause. Candor, humor, and helpful hints abound. I found this book incredibly valuable.

Purchase Meno-What?  HERE

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My 5-Star Review 

Meno-What? by D.G. Kaye

Navigating Menopause with Poise and Humor 

I wish I’d had this book when I was going through menopause! It would have validated all I was feeling and given me some inventive ways of coping with the inevitable changes looming on the threshold of female maturity. 

In her memoir, Meno-What?  D.G. Kaye speaks frankly about the hormonal changes that launch a war against our physical, emotional, and behavioral stability. She humorously refers to them as the “meno dragons,” a term that will be appreciated by any woman who has reached this stage in life. 

Kaye outlines, chapter by chapter, the various changes that challenge our bodies as well as our sanity and self-image. With candor and humor, she tells us how each change affected her body, threatened her vanity, and braced her determination to face each one with an eye toward melioration. 

She coins some pretty hilarious terms in describing these changes. “Circumference expansion” and “meno muffin” refer to our broadening midsections. “Fatback” and “muffin tops” describe the love handles bestowed to our bra lines. “Bottoms down” laments the loss of firmness in our posteriors. “Fred Flintstone feet” bemoans the abhorrent increase in shoe size. And “the Sahara effect” aptly portrays those dreaded, uncomfortable hot flashes. 

Avowing “That isn’t going to happen to me” did not preclude menopausal changes for the author, but it did firm her resolve to deal with them naturally and creatively. When all is said and done, Kaye states, “. . . we should always just be grateful that we are still on the right side of the green.” 

Being an R.N., I knew quite well what lay ahead in my life. What I didn’t know was how menopause would affect me personally. Chock-full of helpful hints, this book serves as both an eye-opener and a lifesaver. It is compact, easily read within an hour or two, and I couldn’t recommend it more highly.  

D.G. Kaye’s Links:  Website/Blog   Amazon   Facebook   Twitter    LinkedIn   Google+

New #Review for #Vampyrie: Origin of the Vampire

Luna Saint ClaireThis is my second thrill of the day! Vampyrie: Origin of the Vampire received another 5-star review. Luna Saint Claire, author of the thrilling novel, The Sleeping Serpent, has posted her review to Goodreads and Amazon.  Luna is a costume designer and author who loves Indie music, has an eclectic bohemian style, and studied ballet in her youth.  Read my interview with Luna here.

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Luna’s review for Vampyrie: Origin of the Vampire

Vampyrie: Origin of the Vampire

I Couldn’t Put it Down!
I have always had a fondness for Vampire stories. It began with Dracula. Twilight was mesmerizing. Vampire Diaries captivated me from the start, and The Originals, my favorite, enthralled me. Vampyrie is a complex, contemporary page-turner that I couldn’t put down! Phoebe, the protagonist is a strong, intelligent, compassionate and fearless character and her passion and perseverance make her a compelling character. What makes this story especially fascinating is the in-depth science, woven in with such elegance that it never detracts from the thrilling suspense. I can totally see this book becoming the next off-the-chart TV series. Well done Tina Frisco

If you aren’t already connected to Luna, please visit her sites, like and share. Thank you for stopping by ♥
Luna’s Sites:  Website/Blog    Amazon    Facebook    Twitter    Goodreads    Pinterest    Instagram    Tumblr    Spotify   

New #Review for #Gabby and the Quads

D.G. Kaye WriterIt was such a thrill to receive another 5-star review for Gabby and the Quads, this time from my lovely friend and fellow author, Debby Gies aka D.G. Kaye. Debby consistently supports and features authors on her blog. She also regularly dons her FBI hat and goes about sleuthing the Internet and blogging world for articles she knows will be of interest to her fellow authors, and then posts these as well. Read my interview with Debby here.

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Debby’s review for Gabby and the Quads

Gabby and the Quads

This book is an absolutely wonderful story book for parents and
little children alike. The author takes us on a little life lesson journey of a little child about to become the big sister to quadruplets. Frisco manages to incorporate important lessons for parents while demonstrating with her words and illustrations by subtly instilling messages about safety, sharing and compassion within the storyline. Her method of showing how the parents ready Gabby for the babies’ arrival, asking her how she would feel about being a big sister and a helper, encouraging the child to love her new siblings, easing her into her new role without being left to feel she is no longer ‘the only child’, but a necessary component to being a helper, a very important role as big sister.

If you have little ones, or about to become parents for a second time, I highly recommend this book as a guide to parents and an enjoyable and entertaining read with educational meaning and reference that is easily understood by young children.

You can also read Debby’s review on Goodreads and Amazon 
If you aren’t already connected to Debby, please visit her sites, like and share. Thank you for stopping by ♥
Debby’s Sites:  Website/Blog   Amazon   Facebook   Twitter   LinkedIn   Google+

Objectivity in book reviews: can you be honest AND objective?

This is a brilliant post by Lynne LeGrow at Fictionophile on book reviews and blogger bashing. A poignant question raised is: Can you write a book review that’s totally devoid of personal preference? I don’t think anyone can write a completely objective book review that doesn’t sound as if they’re dissecting the author’s writing skills. If you’re incensed by blogger bashing, this is a must-read.

Fictionophile

book-review-objectivityThese past few weeks I have read some rather unpleasant comments about book reviewers. Blogger ‘bashing’ seems popular just now.


An example of this blogger bashing:

https://prettymessreading.wordpress.com/…/dear-book-blogge…/

When someone – anyone – calls me or my fellow book bloggers dishonest – then steam starts to come out of my ears.13420806205_766b819771When I give a book 5 stars it is because I love it. I’ve recently given a book 2 stars because it wasn’t to my taste. Everyone’s taste is different. I get most of my books from NetGalley, Edelweiss or directly from publishers. They do not cost me anything, yet I still rate them ALL as according to my enjoyment of them. Why would anyone post anything this hurtful. I do not lie when reviewing books! I do try to be kind, as I know authors invest a lot of emotion, time, and hard work writing. Just because I don’t care for it, there…

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