Thriving Thursdays: Garbage Thinking – Guest Post…

Teagan Ríordáin Geneviene is a guest on The Story Reading Ape, nudging us to remember The Law of the Garbage Truck. Piqued your curiosity? Hop over to Chris’ blog for Teagan’s humorous but all too true observations…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Garbage Truck LawPhoto Credit: Proctor Gallagher Institute

You’re getting ready for work and you spill your coffee.  Cleaning it up, you see that it’s all over your shirt.  You have to change the shirt, and then your pants don’t match the next shirt.  Late for work, you get stuck behind a garbage truck.  It smells.  Bad!  And that’s when the day really turns to garbage… “Murphy’s Law” becomes the law of the garbage truck.

We’ve all had days when one small bad thing sends the day into a tailspin.  Did you notice that as you became focused the first unfortunate thing, the more the little bad things piled up, one after another? 

Shift your focus to something pleasant, something positive.  Do it fast — before the law of the garbage truck kicks-in!

Have a thriving Thursday,

Teagan

Garbage Truck vintage cartoonYou can read my serial stories and learn about my novels at my blog,Teagan’s Books

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Loneliness – Guest Post…

In solitude, some experience loneliness ~ feeling that no one cares ~ while others experience it as merely being alone. Felicity Sidnell is a guest on The Story Reading Ape’s blog today and asks a compelling question: “Why is it then that we seem to have lost sight of the importance of independence and privacy and no longer regard solitude as something that nurtures self-reliance?” Food for thought…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Loneliness

We fear loneliness, so we’re often frightened of being alone and place little value on solitude these days. Many people seem to feel singleness is a parlous state to be criticised or regretted, though so many people live alone these days. We live in a world that is becoming more and more intrusive and the intrusion more acceptable. The ease with which we can connect with family and friends tends to increase our dependency on others. Everywhere we look, people are hugging their phones to their ears or texting a message to someone, clinging to their instrument, as though it will allow them to actually touch the correspondent.

LonelyBut are we depriving our children of the opportunity to be independent and enjoy their own company? Previous generations of children were usually expected to play with the other children on the street or amuse themselves with their siblings or on their…

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Two Great Truths of Absolute and Relative Reality

What is real and what is unreal? What is reality and what is illusion? So many of us think the daily life we lead is reality. And relatively speaking ~ Mother Earth being a schoolhouse and our reason for incarnating ~ this is true. But what gives the body life? The spirit? The soul? The Divine Absolute? Mira Prabhu discusses Relative and Absolute Reality within the metaphor of two birds perched on the branch of a tree: one eats the fruit while the other watches. Which is Relative and which is Absolute? Could it be that The Great Dream is reality and the wakeful state is an illusion?

mira prabhu

SHIVA AND SHAKTI TANTRA

In my volatile teens, I was struck by the poignant beauty of an ancient metaphor (contained within the Mundaka Upanishad) that speaks of two birds perched on the branch of a tree: one bird eats the fruit of the tree while the other watches.

The first bird represents the individual self/soul; distracted by the fruits (signifying sensual pleasures), she forgets her lord and lover and tries to enjoy the fruit independent of him. (This separating amnesia is known in Sanskrit as maha-maya or enthrallment; it results in the plunge of the individual into the ephemeral realm of birth and death.) As for the second bird, it is an aspect of the Divine/Self that rests in every heart—and which remains forever constant even as the individual soul is bedazzled by the material world.

This teaching implies that it is ignorance of our true nature that creates a vicious cycle: the individual, being blinded by the illusion of existing as a separate…

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Hey – Boo – I have a TREAT for YOU! – Guest Post…

Annette Rochelle Aben is a guest on The Story Reading Ape today, telling us about her latest book ~ BooKu, Halloween Haiku ~ which I understand is not for the fainthearted! But if you’re a daring soul, the Kindle version will be available for only 0.99 from midnight Pacific Time on October 16th through midnight Pacific time on October 22nd. Trick or treat!

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

For one week, the Kindle version of my latest book, BooKu, Halloween Haiku will be available for .99!

3D BooKu

If I could cover it in chocolate for you, I do that too but at this price, you can afford to pick up a couple of your favorites to enjoy whilst having a grin reading BooKu.

BooKu takes us behind the scenes of a typical, American, middle-class yard, decked out for that one special night we call, Halloween.

In the light of day, everything looks pretty tame, mighty harmless and rather ordinary (well, that is if rats, skulls and skeletons are your everyday, average yard frou-frou).

Yet, when the moon rises in the pitch of a black sky, frou-frou becomes frightening.

Tiny trick or treaters will never be the same for the experience of having to navigate the path from the sidewalk to the candy. It’s all part…

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Missed Opportunities – Guest Post…

Thank you to Chris Graham for hosting me on his blog, The Story Reading Ape. Those who frequent Chris’ blog know how generous he is in his support of authors and other bloggers. He is one fine Ape, and I think I speak for all of us when saying we’re sure glad ~ not to mention fortunate ~ that he is ours ❤

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

nIyPmE copy

Image is courtesy of Lucie Stastkova

LuSt 4 ART

How many times have you heard yourself say: “I wish I’d said . . .”?  Sometimes we’re simply a little slow on the draw. But sometimes we hesitate, afraid to speak what we’re thinking and feeling. Maybe we’re afraid of not being liked. Maybe we’re uncomfortable with effusive reactions. Maybe we’re afraid of confrontation. Whatever the reason, it’s usually based in fear. And that’s really too bad, because we’ve missed an opportunity to grow.

How many times have you heard yourself say: “I wish I’d told her . . .”?  If we’re reticent to pay someone a compliment — perhaps afraid they may question our motives — then we’ve robbed them and ourselves of a joyful moment. If we’re reluctant to offer someone criticism — perhaps unsure whether we’re capable of handling their reaction — then we’ve robbed them and ourselves…

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Unexpected Mishaps

So much has been going wrong lately that I feel the need to toss a little cuteness and humor onto the path in front of me 😊

gabby-6-23-12“What has been going wrong,” you ask? Well . . .

savannah-3-31-09 Having a good many blogs that I follow disappear from my WordPress reader. Pleeeeeeezee give them back to me!

gabby-2-11-21-11 Being tossed into WordPress spam, along with oodles of my fellow bloggers. At least I had company there, but I did feel a bit slimed 😊

brea-11-11-13 Being thrown into Facebook Jail for “Liking” too many pages too fast. Geez, FB! Why do you care?

gabby-11-7-15Having a friend commit me to a social event that I neither wanted to attend nor could gracefully decline. It wouldn’t have been so bad if the guy hired as part of the entertainment hadn’t mooned the room with a piece of toilet paper hanging from his behind. Was that what I thought it was?

dominic-11-19-13Having someone smash into my car’s bumper, making a right turn from the left lane, eating while driving. Some people just can’t walk and chew gum at the same time.

 All the photos? Well, they are my great nieces and nephews, come to help share my little dip in the pool of unexpected mishaps 😊

gabby-quads-7-31-13Gabby and the Quads   July 2013

john-trips-2-27-14Johnny and the Trips   February 2014

 

If you don’t like Cats and Boxes Meme – LOOK AWAY NOW…

The Story Reading Ape brings us a Cats and Boxes Meme that’s just too good to miss! This is classic feline. A big “Thank You” to our favorite Hominoid for this much-appreciated bit of Friday humor 🙂

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

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Basics Every Indie Author Needs Before Publishing a Book – Guest Post…

Yecheilyah Ysrayl is The Story Reading Ape’s guest today, discussing the difference between a writer and an author, as well as outlining the 3 basics every aspiring author should do before publishing a book: Investment, Author Platform, Social Media. As most of us know who have been at it a while, these are 3 staples for the published author as well. Are you a writer or an author?

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Blog Post 2

When I published my first book, I didn’t see my writing as a business. It was just me doing what I’ve always wanted to do. However, as I began to learn and as I continue to learn, I quickly discovered why Self-Publishing requires so much work: It’s a business.

That doesn’t take away from the fun of it, but the realization did help me to become more organized. I quickly learned why no one was buying: I wasn’t working! Writing is working, technically, and I was doing plenty of that. However, I was not working on the skill of writing, researching my industry, understanding tips to help me to write better books, promoting, marketing, and everything in-between. I was writing, sure. But the business of writing? I didn’t even know it existed. I was a writer and that was all. When I got into the business of writing however, that’s…

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Andrew Joyce, Author

I am thrilled to welcome Andrew Joyce as my guest today.

Andrew Joyce

Andrew is a brilliant storyteller whose continuing adventures are kept on a short leash by his canine companion, Danny the Dog.

Danny XXlI read and reviewed Andrew’s Huck Finn trilogy after having devoured each of the three novels. You can find my rave reviews here.  Although, if you go to Andrew’s Amazon page and click on each of his books, you will find them rife with 5-star reviews.  Apparently, I am only one among myriad Andrew Joyce fans!

Andrew is here today to tell us about the journey that inspired him to write his latest book, Yellow Hair.  Welcome, Andrew! It is a pleasure to host you on my blog.

*************

book-andrew-yellow-hair-2Thank you, Tina. My name is Andrew Joyce and I write books for a living. Tina has been kind enough to allow me a little space on her blog to talk about my latest, Yellow Hair.

Yellow Hair documents the injustices done to the Sioux Nation from their first treaty with the United States in 1805 through Wounded Knee in 1890. Every death, murder, battle, and outrage depicted actually took place—from the first to the last. The historical figures that play a role in my story were real people and I used their real names. I conjured up my protagonist only to weave together the various events conveyed in my fact-based tale of fiction. Yellow Hair is an epic tale of adventure, family, love, and hate that spans most of the 19th century. It is American history.

The inspiration for the book came to me when I was reading a short article and it made reference to the Great Sioux Uprising of 1862. It also mentioned that the outcome involved the largest mass execution in the history of the United States. That piqued my interest.

When I started my research into the incident, one thing led to another and before I knew it, I was documenting the entire history of the Sioux, who are also known as the Dakota, vis-à-vis the relationship between them and the United States.

Because the book exists only because I read the phrase, “the largest mass execution in the history of the United States,” I’ll tell you a little about that. What follows is an extremely abbreviated version of events.

The Dakota signed their first treaty with the United States in 1805 when they sold a small portion of their land to the Americans for the purpose of building forts. It was right after the Louisiana Purchase and President Jefferson wanted a presence in the West. At the time, “the West” was anything on the western side of the Mississippi River.

In the treaty of 1805, the Dakota sold 100,000 acres to the book-andrew-resolutionAmericans. The agreed-upon price was $2.00 per acre. But when the treaty came up before the Senate for ratification, the amount was changed to two cents per acre. That was to be a precursor for all future treaties with the Americans. There were subsequent treaties in 1815, 1825, 1832, 1837, and 1851, and basically the same thing happened with all those treaties.

In 1837, the Americans wanted an additional five million acres of Dakota land. Knowing it would be a hard sell after the way they failed to live up to the letter or spirit of the previous treaties, the government brought twenty-six Dakota chiefs to Washington to show them the might and majesty that was The United States of America.

The government proposed paying one million dollars for the acreage in installments over a twenty-year period. Part of the payment was to be in the form of farm equipment, medicine, and livestock. Intimidated, the Indians signed the treaty and went home. The United States immediately laid claim to the lands—the first payment did not arrive for a year.

The significance of the 1837 treaty lies in the fact that it was the first time “traders” were allowed to lay claim to the Indians’ payments without any proof that money was owed . . . and without consulting the Indians. Monies were subtracted from the imbursements and paid directly to the traders.

By 1851, the Americans wanted to purchase all of the Dakota’s remaining lands—twenty-five million acres. The Sioux did not want to sell, but were forced to do so with threats that the army could be sent in to take the land from them at the point of a gun if they refused the American’s offer.

“If we sell our land, where will we live?” asked the Dakota chief.

book-andrew-molly-lee“We will set aside land for the Dakota only. It is called a reservation and it will be along both banks of the Minnesota River, twenty miles wide, ten on each side and seventy miles long,” answered the Commissioner of Indian Affairs.

The Dakota were offered six cents an acre for land that was worth at least a dollar an acre. The payment would be stretched out over a twenty year period and was to be made in the form of gold coins. One year later, in 1852, the Americans took half the reservation, the seventy miles on the north side of the river. The Dakota were now reduced from a nation of fierce, independent people to a people dependent on hand-outs from the ones who stole not only their land, but also their dignity.

The Dakota were forced to buy their food from the traders who ran trading posts at the Indian Agency the U.S. Government had set up on the reservation. All year long the Dakota would charge what they needed. When the yearly payment for their land arrived, the traders would take what they said was owed them. Subsequently, there was very little gold left for the Dakota.

By 1862, the Dakota were starving. That year’s payment was months late in arriving because of the Civil War. The traders were afraid that because of the war there would be no payment that year and cut off the Dakota’s credit. The Indian Agent had the power to force the traders to release some of the food stocks, but refused when asked to do so by the Dakota.

After they had eaten their ponies and dogs, and their babies cried out in the night from hunger, the Dakota went to war against the United States of America.

They attacked the agency first and liberated the food stock from the book-andrew-redemptionwarehouse, killing many white people who lived there. Then bands of braves set out to loot the farms in the surrounding countryside.

Many whites were killed in the ensuing weeks. However, not all of the Dakota went to war. Many stayed on the reservation and did not pick up arms against their white neighbors. Some saved the lives of white settlers. Still, over 700 hundred whites lost their lives before the rebellion was put down.

When the dust settled, all of the Dakota—including women and children, and those people who had saved settlers’ lives—were made prisoners of war.

Three hundred and ninety-six men were singled out to stand trial before a military commission. They were each tried separately in trials that lasted only minutes. In the end, three hundred and three men were sentenced to death.

Even though he was occupied with the war, President Lincoln got involved. He reviewed all three hundred and three cases and pardoned all but thirty-eight of the prisoners.

On a gray and overcast December morning in 1862, the scaffold stood high. Thirty-eight nooses hung from its crossbeams. The mechanism for springing the thirty-eight trap doors had been tested and retested until it worked perfectly. At exactly noon, a signal was given, a lever pulled, and the largest mass execution to ever take place in the United States of America became part of our history.

*************

Short bioAndrew Joyce left high school at seventeen to hitchhike throughout the US, Canada, and Mexico. He wouldn’t return from his journey until decades later when he decided to become a writer. Joyce has written five books, including a two-volume collection of one hundred and fifty short stories comprised of his hitching adventures called BEDTIME STORIES FOR GROWN-UPS (as yet unpublished), and his latest novel, YELLOW HAIR. He now lives aboard a boat in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, with his dog, Danny, where he is busy working on his next book, tentatively entitled, MICK REILLY.

Learn more about Andrew:   Website   Blog   Facebook   Twitter   LinkedIn  Amazon   Barnes & Noble   Smashwords   iTunes   Kobo

 

Macabre Macaroni – Guest Post…

Don’t let the title of this guest post fool you. Craig Boyack is anything but macabre. He’s a down-to-earth, hard-working father and husband who just happens to write sci-fi and fantasy. During the month of October, he’ll be running multiple promos, will have an Amazon giveaway, and will post some micro-fiction on his blog that he calls Macabre Macaroni. Hop over to The Story Reading Apes’ blog for all the details 🙂

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

It looks like Chris decided to allow me back after my last post. I’m honored to be here, and this is the second of four posts he offered.

October is my favorite month of the year. I was born in October, so maybe that’s part of it. I like the changing leaves, the dropping temperatures, and the hint of mischief in the air, Halloween is coming you know. One of the things I have planned this year is to be everywhere during October. This post is part of that effort.

My own blog is called Entertaining Stories and it’s basically Craig central. It feeds into my Facebook Page and Twitter, but the madness happens on the blog.

This month I’m going to be running multiple promos. At the time of this writing, I haven’t initiated them yet (It’s August right now) but here is what I have planned…

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