Category Archives: Health

This antibiotic will ruin you. 

If you have taken fluoroquinolone antibiotics (e.g., Cipro, Levaquin, Avalox), BEWARE. Amy Moser details the devastating side effects she endured, necessitating 20 surgeries. Should you be skeptical of this information, she lists myriad links to fluoroquinolone warnings. And since fluoroquinolone antibacterial drugs damage mitochondrial DNA, parents should take special heed…

Mountains and Mustard Seeds

4739Hi there, we need to talk. My name is Amy Moser. I have almost written this post at least 20 times and got too overwhelmed and abandoned it. Well here goes…

The antibiotics you took or are taking for your sinus infection, UTI, skin infection, laser eye surgery…ect…may have already damaged you.

Cipro, Levaquin, Avalox, nearly every generic ending in “quin”, “oxacin,””ox,”…are all part of a large family of antibiotics called “Fluoroquinolones.” The FDA finally updated their warning on these antibiotics as of July 2016. They site “multiple system damage that may be irreversible. Permanent you guys. Here is the link for the warning if you are a doubting Thomas: https://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DrugSafety/ucm500143.htm. Take a gander real quick if you are reading this with an eyebrow raised. Trust me, I wish I had been given the opportunity to soak up this information before it was too late.

In 2010, I took…

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Chronic Illness and Self-Acceptance

Lucie Stastkova Art
Photo courtesy of Lucie Stastkova

Living with a chronic illness is a challenge at best. If the illness is devastating but not recognized by the medical establishment, convincing ourselves life is worth living becomes an uphill battle.

In the year 2000, I was diagnosed with a chronic illness that presented as a drop-dead flu. I’d been symptomatic since in the 1980s, but early on, flareups were few and far between. Innumerable doctor visits always produced tests with negative results. Over time, symptoms increased in severity and duration until they became immobilizing and constant in 1999.

I knew my doctors thought I was malingering. I felt invalidated yet knew damn well something was wrong. I lived in fear of a dreaded disease not being detected in time to be treated. Simultaneously, I wasn’t sure I wanted to live. By 1999 I was nearly bedridden; in debilitating pain; overwhelmed by fatigue; suffering varying degrees of GI problems; plagued by sleep disturbances, cognitive dysfunction, free-floating anxiety, panic attacks, and depression; and had a constant low-grade fever with sore throat and swollen lymph nodes. It wasn’t until I consulted a rheumatologist that I finally got a clinical diagnosis – one based on physical examination, as no definitive tests existed.

Since I was too sick to work and had been denied disability for two years, I exhausted my savings and retirement. Add to this that I had to advocate for myself while nearly bedridden, exhausted, and in constant pain, it’s no wonder I reached the point of planning to end my life.

So what stopped me? I had lists made of people to whom all of my possessions should be given. I knew where and how I would take the final leap. The only question left unanswered was when. What prompted me to delay making a decision?

Lucie Stastkova Art
Image courtesy of Lucie Stastkova

Antidepressants helped somewhat but left me feeling flat and worthless. I also hated putting pharmaceuticals into my body. Two things saved me: my spiritual practice and the constant reminder of love from treasured friends. I had to learn to grant myself the same acceptance, compassion, and love I so freely bestowed upon others. It has been said by many – myself included, at times – that we are incapable of loving another if we do not first love ourselves. But I found the exact opposite to be true. I felt deep love and compassion for others, but every time I looked in the mirror, I faced self-loathing for the specter I’d become. I knew that in order to survive, I needed to turn the same love and compassion inward.

My belief that Mother Earth is a schoolhouse deterred me from ending my life. If we incarnate to learn specific lessons, and if we leave short of learning those lessons, we’ll need to return and undergo the very same experiences in order to grow. I didn’t want to backtrack. I didn’t want to suffer the same ordeals when all I had to do was commit to seeing them through this time around.

It hasn’t been easy, but it has been rewarding. I’m no longer taking pharmaceuticals and don’t rely on allopathic medicine for anything more than relative diagnosis and emergency/trauma care. There’s no known cure for this illness and the etiology is unknown. I still have flareups, but other than low-level pain and fatigue, the symptoms are no longer constant. I’m still learning to love myself, and I wonder if that isn’t an ongoing struggle for all unenlightened humans.

My biggest challenge is keeping up with social media. Writing can be accomplished when I’m feeling well enough, but maintaining an online presence can be demanding. I often find myself merely treading water. And when in a flareup, I feel as if I’m trudging through neck-high water, pushing myself to complete the simplest of tasks.

Lucie Stastkova Art
Image courtesy of Lucie Stastkova

I’ve lived with this condition for over 25 years and generally take it in stride. But since flareups are random and of unpredictable severity and duration, I’m finding it difficult to plan and write blog posts, visit other’s blogs and share their posts on a regular basis, and read the books on my overflowing TBR in a timely fashion. When I visit blogs, my ability to comment depends on my cognitive state at that moment.

When in a flareup, I have to accept a stop-and-start work scenario:  work a little, rest a little; work a little, rest a little. And I’m usually unable to do little more than click on a few share buttons, unless the fatigue and mental fog clear long enough for me to write a few lucid sentences. If lucky and my head isn’t dropping to the keyboard, I’m able to do a reblog or create a post. The challenge in all of this is self-acceptance and not giving in to frustration.

I remind myself each day not to become my own worst enemy. Self-acceptance on all levels is crucial to survival. Compassion for oneself is as vital as breathing. What concerns me most is not being understood by the people in my life. It’s difficult to imagine – much less believe – what someone else is experiencing when their condition or situation borders on unfathomable.

I hope my fellow bloggers will understand when I’m unable to visit their blogs as frequently as they visit mine. I hope my fellow authors will understand when I’m unable to read and review their books as quickly as they do mine. My desire and intention are to pay it forward; at the very least, to be reciprocal. Yet when a flareup strikes, I fall short in meeting my goals. I’m still learning to accept this as a life lesson for which I contracted before I incarnated. We all choose the lessons we want to learn before we come in to this earthwalk. The trick is not to give up on ourselves.

Self-acceptance. Self-love. Self-compassion. I’m still a work in progress . . .

Until the next time, my friends . . .  Namaste ❤ 

Smorgasbord Health 2017 – Before you begin that crash diet in the New Year!

Sally Cronin is a nutritional therapist with years of experience. She developed her own comprehensive approach to weight reduction when it became critical for her personally. This article is the introduction to a series she will be featuring on her blog. Her book, Size Matters, is a superb reference and guide for anyone wishing to reduce their weight.

Smorgasbord - Variety is the spice of life

Smorgasbord Health 2017

I will be repeating my weight reduction programme again in 2017. The programme is designed around your body’s needs rather than your desire to get into a size or two smaller. From a nutritional perspective it is vital that when you are removing unwanted weight that you still provide your body with the nutrients that are essential for health.

However before you make plans to buy the latest wonder diet products you might like to read this first.  You can reduce weight healthily and safely and a great deal cheaper by cooking from scratch and by taking moderate exercise.

The “diet industry” is worth billions of pounds/dollars a year. The body is 100,000 years old or so – yet it is only really in the last 50 years that we have been told by experts that we have been doing it all wrong for the last 99,950 of them…

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Smorgasbord Health A-Z of Common Conditions – Acne

Sally Cronin has started a new series on her blog: A-Z of Common Conditions. As a nutritional therapist, she is a wealth of knowledge. If you would like her to highlight a particular ailment, drop by her blog and leave your request in a comment. I know she would love to hear from you, and the more requests she gets for a particular topic, the more likely she is to write about it ❤

Smorgasbord - Variety is the spice of life

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The start of a new series with the A – Z of common conditions.  Some posts will be new and others will recycle previous posts with any relevant updates.  I have received several emails in the last couple of months about acneand so I am posting the article from April again.

Acne is the curse of the teen years and also as we go through hormonal changes later in life.. There is also a strong link to diet, especially the the over indulgence in sugars.

Some organs play a major role in our survival and others can be removed without impacting our general health in any significant way. As we have evolved, so an organ’s function may have changed to accommodate our modern environment, especially if their role is protective as in the case of the liver and the elimination of toxins. In this polluted world our body is…

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Book Review: Size Matters by Sally Cronin

book-sally-size-mattersPublished  15 August 2016   Amazon

Size Matters is Sally Georgina Cronin’s no-holds-barred, true-life story of her journey from near-death obesity to vibrant health.

I first was struck by the author’s willingness to share so many personal things that most of us would hold to dearly as private; things that would humiliate us; things that we’d be hard-pressed to look in the mirror and admit even to ourselves. I knew that anyone willing to bridge this gap must be someone with integrity and a deep concern for her fellow human beings.

I didn’t have to go far into the book to find the encouragement I needed. The last paragraph of chapter one said it all for me:       “What began as a painful journey into my past became an exciting adventure in the present with expectations of a much brighter future.” Above all else, I wanted a bright future. And Ms. Cronin’s approach proffered that hope.

I’m not going to detail the specifics of this book, because a peek inside on Amazon will show you the table of contents and highlight the details of the program she developed.

What I want to shine a light on is the inspiration she exemplifies and sallyoffers to all those battling a weight problem. She knew that almost any help given by the medical/scientific/etc. communities would offer template approaches to weight reduction, approaches that she and many others have tried and failed at miserably. Because her health was in such jeopardy, she needed not only to urgently change her eating habits, but also to have the results be permanent. Thus began her journey within and her search for a sustainable healthy future.

It’s difficult enough to put one foot in front of the other on a daily basis in this fast-paced technological age. Everyone is multi-tasking and running fast to stand still. So when we find ourselves faced with a life-threatening condition, fear leads us to seek a quick fix. But quick fixes are almost never permanent and almost always detrimental. The author recognized this and strove instead to find her own way back home to herself.

Although despairing and contemplating suicide, she reached deep inside and found a way to kindle her common sense, which provided the ladder needed to climb out of the pit into which she’d dug herself. Admitting her weaknesses and acknowledging her strengths, she put the totality of herself into turning her life around. Plying patience and dogged determination, she climbed out of the suffocating abyss and surfaced into the fresh air of a promising and vibrant life.

sally-10I have never been obese, but I have carried extra weight at different times throughout my life. Taking off 10 or 15 pounds is hard enough. I can only imagine the devastation one must feel when facing the necessity of a 150-pound weight reduction. And I use the word “reduction” rather than “loss,” because I think the mind always seeks to find that which has been lost.

In my opinion, this book is not only a comprehensive text for permanent weight reduction, but also a “how to” guide for breaking the shackles of destructive behavior and tenaciously moving forward.

When asked in grade school to name five people who inspire us, most children look to either their families or noted figures in the world. And yet there are so many working humbly behind the global scenes who seek neither notoriety nor acclaim. I believe they’re referred to as unsung heroes.

sally-sam
This review is as much an acknowledgement of the author’s positive contribution to the world as it is of her all-inclusive approach to weight reduction in this outstanding book, which I highly recommend. Lose an ounce of weight, gain a pound of self-confidence. Sally Cronin is an inspirational example for all.

Sally’s Links:     Website      Facebook      Twitter       LinkedIn                                                          Google+      Amazon

Smorgasbord Health – Food in the News – You probably do not want to read this.

Do you REALLY know what’s in your food? Did you ever consider that it might contain anti-freeze, human hair, or beavers’ scent sacs, just to name a few of the horrendous ingredients in industrialized food? The corporate food industry is literally allowed to get away with murder, because consistently eating these foods leads to a multitude of diseases that eventually kill us. Sally Cronin has a very enlightening post on her blog today, and it would behoove all of us to take note. “An estimated 75% of diseases that kill us prematurely are lifestyle related . . . It is about the nature of the food we consume.”

Smorgasbord - Variety is the spice of life

smorgasbord health

There are some articles on food studies that I just gloss over to be honest as they are usually funded by parties with an invested interest. In recent years the sugar cartels have been very active as are the meat and grain consortiums.

However, one area that I am definitely interested in is industrialised food. I avoid the term processed food because some of our natural products will go through some form of processing to reach our tables.. dairy products for example.

However, industrially produced food is a very different beast and that is because it is usually more man-made than naturally sourced. Over the years governments have forced food manufacturers to add more and more to the labels until it has become a farce. Apart from needing a visit to an optician for bottle top glasses to read the print, you need a degree in chemistry to identify…

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Smorgasbord Health – A close encounter with a silent killer – Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

Carbon monoxide (CO) exposure is the leading cause of poison-related deaths in the U.S. Sally Cronin discusses this silent killer and relates a trying and near fatal personal experience. Here are a few more articles you might find helpful: http://www.bestheating.com/thesilentkiller, https://www.americannursetoday.com/carbon-monoxide-poisoning-silent-killer/, https://www.health.ny.gov/publications/2826.pdf.

Smorgasbord - Variety is the spice of life

smorgasbord healthIn 2009 I was living with my mother full time and whilst I would spend time with her during the day for the odd hour of two when she was awake, I would spend most of my time in the kitchen diner working on my laptop and within earshot if there was a problem.

We had settled into a routine and most days followed the same pattern. Suddenly I began to experience mild headaches on a regular basis. I put it down to stress and would go out for a walk along the seafront and the headache would subside. Then we hit a spell of very wet weather and so I was confined to the house unless I was out doing the shopping or doing my radio shows.

The headaches got worse and after about four weeks I was in constant pain despite taking painkillers. I went to the walk-in…

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Women’s Health Week Revisited – The progresson of Osteoporosis over 50.

Maintaining bone health can be a challenge, especially as we age. Vitamins K and D3 play a vital role, along with daily exercise. Visit Sally’s blog to learn what you can include in your diet and exercise routine to promote healthy bones…

Smorgasbord - Variety is the spice of life

women

Over the last few posts I have covered most of the stages in a woman’s life by looking at the phases in our reproductive cycle from conception through to menopause. I also wrote about the endocrine system and hormones whose protection does decrease as we get into our 50s and 60s. Without adequate nutrition and exercise, our skeleton too begins to weaken. As our bones become less dense we are at risk of fractures and loss of joint flexibility. Osteoporosis is more prevalent in women than men but affects both.

Statistics for Osteoporosis

Worldwide, osteoporosis causes more than 8.9 million fractures annually, resulting in an osteoporotic fracture every 3 seconds.

Osteoporosis is estimated to affect 200 million women worldwide – approximately one-tenth of women aged 60, one-fifth of women aged 70, two-fifths of women aged 80 and two-thirds of women aged 90.

Osteoporosis affects an estimated 75 million people in…

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Pet of the Week – Meet Therapy Dog Gabby and blogger Susan Palmer Gutterman

Companion animals give so much in return for so little. Animals who participate in therapeutic settings offer so much more. This is the story of Gabby and her person, Susan Palmer Gutterman

Smorgasbord - Variety is the spice of life

Pet of the week

Today our pet of the week is Yellow Labrador Gabby who lives in San Jose in California. Gabby has a very important job as a therapy dog bringing love and healing to children and their families at the Ronald McDonald House.

Gabby is a therapy dog at Ronald McDonald House

Ronald McDonald House creates a home-away-from-home and supportive community for families of children with life-threatening illnesses receiving specialized treatment at local hospitals.

Gabby and her close friend Hibachi.

Hibachi (top) is staying with us for the summer. He is a career change dog from Guide Dogs for the Blind and his owner is Lizzy Kemp. He is super well-behaved and we have fallen in love with him and Gabby (right) is soooo happy to have a buddy to hang out with!!

About Susan Palmer Gutterman

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I would love to tell you that I am a blithe, free-spirit who will captivate you with my amazing adventures.  Alas, in reality…

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The Medicine Woman’s Larder – Mushrooms – The Egyptians believed they granted immortality

Sally Cronin regularly shares her vast knowledge of nutrition in her ongoing Medicine Woman’s Larder series. Today’s post covers the many varieties of mushroom and their medicinal properties…

Smorgasbord - Variety is the spice of life

Medicine Womans larder

According to the ancient Egyptians, over 4,000 years ago, eating mushrooms granted you immortality. The pharaohs even went as far as to ban commoners from eating these delicious fungi but it was probably more to guarantee that they received an ample supply. Mushrooms have played a large role in the diet of many cultures and there is evidence that 3,000 years ago certain varieties of mushrooms were used in Chinese medicine and they still play a huge role in Chinese cuisine today.

There are an estimated 20,000 varieties of mushrooms growing around the modern world, with around 2,000 being edible. Of these, over 250 types of mushroom have been recognised as being medically active or therapeutic.

More and more research is indicating that certain varieties have the overwhelming potential to cure cancer and AIDS and in Japan some of the extracts from mushrooms are already being used in mainstream medicine.

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Middle Aged Spread – Stress busting with Status Quo.. or any music you love.

Music moves our souls as well as our bodies. For many of us, it has been and continues to be a lifesaver. Sally Cronin outlines the many health benefits of music in this wonderful post…

Smorgasbord - Variety is the spice of life

radio stressIn the previous post last week on middle-aged spread and the connection to stress I gave you some of the reasons why it can increase weight and thwart your efforts to remove it.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2016/08/23/smorgasbord-health-middle-aged-spread-not-always-down-to-what-you-eat/

There are also a couple of posts that will offer you some strategies on managing stress and also how you can make some changes to your diet to support you.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2016/04/05/smorgasbord-health-stress-drama-drama-drama-how-is-your-body-coping/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2016/04/07/smorgasbord-health-stress-strategies-and-foods-to-support-you/

This time I am going to cover the stress buster that works for me and has been scientifically proven to have a positive influence on our brains.

I have always used music to relax and to energise and certainly cannot imagine a life without it.

By now those of you following my blog will have noticed that I have a great belief in music and its therapeutic properties.  I keep an eye on research into the benefits of not just listening to music but…

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The Health Benefits of Reading Fiction – Guest Post…

Toni Pike gives us an extensive list of health benefits derived from reading fiction, some of which we may never have considered. Head over to The Story Reading Ape for details …

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

22106808 - 3d man sitting and reading a book with idea bulb in thought bubble isolated over white backgroundSource: Free to use image Copyright amasterpics123 123RF Stock Photo

Reports suggest that less than fifty percent of people read fiction, and that number may be declining. I was recently surprised to find out that a relative of mine, a middle-aged man, never reads novels and chooses instead to watch podcasts. A close friend told me that she only reads magazines, and someone else said that he hadn’t read a book for years.

That inspired me to list the health benefits of reading fiction. There are so many positive effects that it should be made compulsory. It helps your career path, improves the functioning of your brain, increases your social skills and helps prevent disease. That means there are significant impacts on your physical, social, spiritual and mental health.

The Health Benefits

  1. Young people who read extensively tend to do well at school and university. They often go on to…

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Smorgasbord Weekly Round Up – New promotions, Charming fur writers and War stories

Sally Cronin‘s blog is truly one of the most eclectic in the blogosphere. Hop over and treat yourself to a fountain of different flavors 🙂

Smorgasbord - Variety is the spice of life

Welcome to the weekly round up and another week has flown by.  It is a while since I have done any house painting and there have been a few complaints from some joints and muscles that have been given a workout.. I love this part as the bare plastered walls take on some colour although we have stuck with pearl grey throughout most of the house as we have so many posters and pictures that will add a lot more colour.

David prepares the rooms and then lets me loose..I stick my headphones in my ears and I must thank my collaborators in my creative endeavours this week including Status Quo, Tina Turner, George Ezra, Jack Savoretti, Olly Murs and Ricky Martin. I would also like to thank my parents, my hairdresser, podiatrist and chiropractor for this award!!

Anyway… I am entitled to breaks during the day and with some…

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