Category Archives: Health

The American democracy wasn’t built in a day, but it could be destroyed swiftly and imperceptibly

A delightful surprise to find this reblog of my post on chronic illness. My thanks to Marcus and the folks at ‘From guestwriters.’ Please head over and enjoy their informative blog ❤ 

From guestwriters

An American lady who felt compelled to write a novel of hope and who want us to keep our hearts open and act within love instead of reacting out of fear looks at her own country where some one pulls the strings in a dangerous manner.

She writes

Believe me when I tell you that living in the U.S. right now is like being on a nonstop roller coaster ride, minus the thrill. I don’t understand the mindset of those who think our current POTUS is America’s savior. Perhaps they’re not dependent on healthcare for their lives. Perhaps they don’t live paycheck-to-paycheck. Perhaps they’ve never experienced having the rug pulled out from under them. Or perhaps they’ve experienced all of these and are so desperate for change that they cannot see through all the lies.

One has only to read how Hitler came to power in 1930’s Germany to see…

View original post 166 more words

Advertisements

Chronic Illness Update

One year ago, I published a post on Chronic Illness and Self-Acceptance. I wanted my fellow bloggers to understand when I wasn’t unable to visit their blogs as often as they did mine. I wanted my fellow authors to understand when I was unable to read and review their books as quickly as they did mine.

My condition hasn’t changed, but the state of affairs in my country (U.S.) has. I mention this because stress has a profound effect on inducing flareups. Not knowing from one day to the next if I’ll continue to have health insurance or a roof over my head has challenged my inherent optimistic perspective on life. Also, the cold of winter tends to exacerbate symptoms.

So I’m writing this to let all of you know I might be a little scarce over the next couple of months. But truly, I just don’t know. I never know when I’ll have a flareup or how long it will last. What I do know is that the everyday stress of dreading what havoc my government will wreak next upon its citizens is threatening to take a toll on my health.

Believe me when I tell you that living in the U.S. right now is like being on a nonstop roller coaster ride, minus the thrill. I don’t understand the mindset of those who think our current POTUS is America’s savior. Perhaps they’re not dependent on healthcare for their lives. Perhaps they don’t live paycheck-to-paycheck. Perhaps they’ve never experienced having the rug pulled out from under them. Or perhaps they’ve experienced all of these and are so desperate for change that they cannot see through all the lies.

One has only to read how Hitler came to power in 1930’s Germany to see the analogous framework already established here in the U.S. Denying this or accepting it as a benign trade-off is extremely dangerous. Our democracy wasn’t built in a day, but it could be destroyed swiftly and imperceptibly. However, I remain hopeful.

Photo by Ningren

I know the old patriarchal world order is dying; and as with anything facing imminent death, it’s digging in its heels for a last stand. Conditions might even get worse before the beast takes its final breath. Yet I will not be daunted. I won’t allow the power elite to rob me of hope; or worse yet, scare me into questioning what I know to be true.

Humankind is skating on the edge of heightened consciousness. But in order to fully know and appreciate expansion, one must experience constriction. We are germinating in the rich soil of explosive growth. The challenge is keeping our wits about us while embroiled in chaos. Which brings me back to my reason for writing this.

Photo by Ningren

Maintaining a positive healthy attitude amid the confusion and uncertainty in my country is a demanding exercise. Coping with a chronic illness while riding this wave necessitates an ever-refueling energy reserve. I’m finding myself inordinately fatigued and requiring more sleep.

So please know that while you might not see me around very much over the next couple of months, I have not forgotten you. I hope you understand and will remember me 😊 Much love to you, my friends. Hope reigns. Namaste

Original post: Chronic Illness and Self-Acceptance

Plastic – Polluting our Oceans

Lisa Shambrook details the destructive force we’ve come to rely on in almost every aspect of our lives: PLASTIC. My heart is broken when I see our beloved animals suffocated and strangled; when I see plastic littering every corner of our beautiful Mother Earth; when I think of the chemicals ingested by our children, chemicals that some in the scientific community purport to be at levels below those considered harmful. This is a comprehensive article that I highly #recommend reading … 

The Last Krystallos

Do we need plastic?
That’s one of the questions I believe we should be asking ourselves,
as the ocean begins to drown in the man-made material…

Plastic - Polluting Our Oceans - The Last Krystallos

A plastic-free society is a scenario I definitely pose in my current manuscript The Seren Stone Chronicles (unedited excerpt):

‘Will’s eyebrows shot up. “There’s no plastic!”

“Legend has it that all your plastic got swallowed up by mother earth in the lunar apocalypse,” said Ianthe. “It melted in the pit of her belly.”

“Best place for it,” said Rhianna.’

In my future Wales, plastic has become a thing of the past, but how do we know how the phenomenon of this synthetic material created only 110 years ago (though natural polymers have been around for generations) and widely available from the 1940’s after the introduction of Tupperware, will ultimately affect the earth that we live on?

Plastic - Polluting Our Oceans - Earth - the last krystallos © Lisa Shambrook

I glance about me…

View original post 1,141 more words

This antibiotic will ruin you. 

If you have taken fluoroquinolone antibiotics (e.g., Cipro, Levaquin, Avalox), BEWARE. Amy Moser details the devastating side effects she endured, necessitating 20 surgeries. Should you be skeptical of this information, she lists myriad links to fluoroquinolone warnings. And since fluoroquinolone antibacterial drugs damage mitochondrial DNA, parents should take special heed…

Mountains and Mustard Seeds

4739Hi there, we need to talk. My name is Amy Moser. I have almost written this post at least 20 times and got too overwhelmed and abandoned it. Well here goes…

The antibiotics you took or are taking for your sinus infection, UTI, skin infection, laser eye surgery…ect…may have already damaged you.

Cipro, Levaquin, Avalox, nearly every generic ending in “quin”, “oxacin,””ox,”…are all part of a large family of antibiotics called “Fluoroquinolones.” The FDA finally updated their warning on these antibiotics as of July 2016. They site “multiple system damage that may be irreversible. Permanent you guys. Here is the link for the warning if you are a doubting Thomas: https://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DrugSafety/ucm500143.htm. Take a gander real quick if you are reading this with an eyebrow raised. Trust me, I wish I had been given the opportunity to soak up this information before it was too late.

In 2010, I took…

View original post 1,312 more words

Chronic Illness and Self-Acceptance

Living with a chronic illness is a challenge at best. If the illness is devastating but not recognized by the medical establishment, convincing ourselves life is worth living becomes an uphill battle.

Lucie Stastkova Art
Photo Courtesy of Lucie Stastkova

In the year 2000, I was diagnosed with a chronic illness that presented as a drop-dead flu. I’d been symptomatic since in the 1980s, but early on, flareups were few and far between. Innumerable doctor visits always produced tests with negative results. Over time, symptoms increased in severity and duration until they became immobilizing and constant in 1999.

I knew my doctors thought I was malingering. I felt invalidated yet knew damn well something was wrong. I lived in fear of a dreaded disease not being detected in time to be treated. Simultaneously, I wasn’t sure I wanted to live. By 1999 I was nearly bedridden; in debilitating pain; overwhelmed by fatigue; suffering varying degrees of GI problems; plagued by sleep disturbances, cognitive dysfunction, free-floating anxiety, panic attacks, and depression; and had a constant low-grade fever with sore throat and swollen lymph nodes. It wasn’t until I consulted a rheumatologist that I finally got a clinical diagnosis – one based on physical examination, as no definitive tests existed.

Since I was too sick to work and had been denied disability for two years, I exhausted my savings and retirement. Add to this that I had to advocate for myself while nearly bedridden, exhausted, and in constant pain, it’s no wonder I reached the point of planning to end my life.

So what stopped me? I had lists made of people to whom all of my possessions should be given. I knew where and how I would take the final leap. The only question left unanswered was when. What prompted me to delay making a decision?

Lucie Stastkova Art
Image Courtesy of Lucie Stastkova

Antidepressants helped somewhat but left me feeling flat and worthless. I also hated putting pharmaceuticals into my body. Two things saved me: my spiritual practice and the constant reminder of love from treasured friends. I had to learn to grant myself the same acceptance, compassion, and love I so freely bestowed upon others. It has been said by many – myself included, at times – that we are incapable of loving another if we do not first love ourselves. But I found the exact opposite to be true. I felt deep love and compassion for others, but every time I looked in the mirror, I faced self-loathing for the specter I’d become. I knew that in order to survive, I needed to turn the same love and compassion inward.

My belief that Mother Earth is a schoolhouse deterred me from ending my life. If we incarnate to learn specific lessons, and if we leave short of learning those lessons, we’ll need to return and undergo the very same experiences in order to grow. I didn’t want to backtrack. I didn’t want to suffer the same ordeals when all I had to do was commit to seeing them through this time around.

It hasn’t been easy, but it has been rewarding. I’m no longer taking pharmaceuticals and don’t rely on allopathic medicine for anything more than relative diagnosis and emergency/trauma care. There’s no known cure for this illness and the etiology is unknown. I still have flareups, but other than low-level pain and fatigue, the symptoms are no longer constant. I’m still learning to love myself, and I wonder if that isn’t an ongoing struggle for all unenlightened humans.

My biggest challenge is keeping up with social media. Writing can be accomplished when I’m feeling well enough, but maintaining an online presence can be demanding. I often find myself merely treading water. And when in a flareup, I feel as if I’m trudging through neck-high water, pushing myself to complete the simplest of tasks.

Lucie Stastkova Art
Image Courtesy of Lucie Stastkova

I’ve lived with this condition for over 25 years and generally take it in stride. But since flareups are random and of unpredictable severity and duration, I’m finding it difficult to plan and write blog posts, visit other’s blogs and share their posts on a regular basis, and read the books on my overflowing TBR in a timely fashion. When I visit blogs, my ability to comment depends on my cognitive state at that moment.

When in a flareup, I have to accept a stop-and-start work scenario:  work a little, rest a little; work a little, rest a little. And I’m usually unable to do little more than click on a few share buttons, unless the fatigue and mental fog clear long enough for me to write a few lucid sentences. If lucky and my head isn’t dropping to the keyboard, I’m able to do a reblog or create a post. The challenge in all of this is self-acceptance and not giving in to frustration.

I remind myself each day not to become my own worst enemy. Self-acceptance on all levels is crucial to survival. Compassion for oneself is as vital as breathing. What concerns me most is not being understood by the people in my life. It’s difficult to imagine – much less believe – what someone else is experiencing when their condition or situation borders on unfathomable.

I hope my fellow bloggers will understand when I’m unable to visit their blogs as frequently as they visit mine. I hope my fellow authors will understand when I’m unable to read and review their books as quickly as they do mine. My desire and intention are to pay it forward; at the very least, to be reciprocal. Yet when a flareup strikes, I fall short in meeting my goals. I’m still learning to accept this as a life lesson for which I contracted before I incarnated. We all choose the lessons we want to learn before we come in to this earthwalk. The trick is not to give up on ourselves.

Self-acceptance. Self-love. Self-compassion. I’m still a work in progress . . .

Until the next time, my friends . . .  Namaste

© Tina Frisco 2017

Smorgasbord Health 2017 – Before you begin that crash diet in the New Year!

Sally Cronin is a nutritional therapist with years of experience. She developed her own comprehensive approach to weight reduction when it became critical for her personally. This article is the introduction to a series she will be featuring on her blog. Her book, Size Matters, is a superb reference and guide for anyone wishing to reduce their weight.

Smorgasbord - Variety is the spice of life

Smorgasbord Health 2017

I will be repeating my weight reduction programme again in 2017. The programme is designed around your body’s needs rather than your desire to get into a size or two smaller. From a nutritional perspective it is vital that when you are removing unwanted weight that you still provide your body with the nutrients that are essential for health.

However before you make plans to buy the latest wonder diet products you might like to read this first.  You can reduce weight healthily and safely and a great deal cheaper by cooking from scratch and by taking moderate exercise.

The “diet industry” is worth billions of pounds/dollars a year. The body is 100,000 years old or so – yet it is only really in the last 50 years that we have been told by experts that we have been doing it all wrong for the last 99,950 of them…

View original post 1,908 more words

Pat Cody, Founder of DES Action. My @BBCWomansHour #WHPowerList #charity

Judith Barrow with a superb article about Pat Cody, founder of DES Action. DES (diethylstilboestrol), the synthetic estrogen given to women for 30 years until 1973, was expected to prevent miscarriages. Instead, it caused cancer and fertility problems in some daughters and granddaughters of the women who had taken the drug. I first learned about DES, as well as thalidomide — which caused multiple fetal deformities — in nursing school.  Pharmaceuticals are prescribed too loosely and taken too readily by too many. Given that Big Pharma is a multi-billion-dollar-a-year industry that cares little about the devastating effects of its products, it’s a wonder so many of us are still alive …

Judith Barrow

pat-codyOver the last few months Woman’s Hour on Radio Four has been showcasing seventy women who have promoted women’s issues or represented women in some way  through the last seven decades that the programme has run. They presented the final seven last week: http://bbc.in/2hvqozr

There was one woman who I think was missed; a woman who, around her own kitchen table, started a charity which has gone from strength to strength in most countries, except the UK.

Pat Cody  started DES Action in 1971 (http://www.desaction.org/)   after she learned that the daughters of women who took the anti-miscarriage drug during pregnancy developed cancer and reproductive problems. Pat had taken the drug while pregnant with her first daughter, Martha. Pat served as program director for the group and edited its newsletter. She passed away in September 2010.

Images of Diethylstilboestrol/ Stilboestrol(DES)

download-26download-28images-22The mission of DES Action groups worldwide is to identify…

View original post 479 more words

Smorgasbord Christmas Party -Food and Drink – Dinner for the fur family.

Oh, the goosebumps … and the tears ~ of joy. Sally Cronin‘s post on feeding our fur families is exquisite. She includes multiple tips and links, as well as some delicious-sounding homemade recipes. The clincher, however, is the video. Thirty homeless fur balls are given a holiday feast, and several are adopted; the perfect critter holiday video   

Smorgasbord - Variety is the spice of life

Smorgasbord Christmas PartyThis is an updated post from a year ago today with new videos and information.

Apart from the recipes there are some health issues that are important if you are not going to have sick pets during the holidays. Many human foods, especially packaged full of chemicals can be very harmful.

dog

During our thousands of years of our relationship with dogs up to around 30 years ago, pets were fed on scraps from our own dinner. Then the billion dollar a year pet food industry was born…. and the majority of our domestic dogs and cats went from eating natural food to dry pellets. (Almost 24 Billion dollars in the US alone!).  http://www.americanpetproducts.org/press_industrytrends.asp

I appreciate that most of the animal foods available today may be touted as being rich in nutrients and full of vitality but I am afraid that I steer clear of dried food and its additives…

View original post 986 more words

Food in Fiction – Part 4 – Guest Post…

Christine Campbell brings us Part 4 of Food in Fiction as a guest on The Story Reading Ape. Christine’s novels tend to feature food. Yet even if our novels don’t, she suggests at least deciding what and where our characters like to eat, in order to enhance their reader appeal. Good advice! Hop over to Chris’ blog for the full story …

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

unnamed-3

In this, the fourth and last article on the topic of Food in Fiction, I thought I’d let you into a badly kept secret.

Having been married since forever and having brought up a family of five, I can cook – but I wouldn’t say I was good at it. Perhaps that’s why none of the main characters in my novels have been great cooks. I’ve had my share of disasters too, though not ever on the scale of Hugh’s in my WIP, For What it’s Worth.

By the time she turned into the communal stair of the flats, Sandra had built up a fair head of steam in her boiler, fuelled by the indignity she suffered at work set against the memory of Hugh lying warm and sleepy in their bed when she left him this morning and sitting with his feet on the coffee table all day…

View original post 895 more words

Aging and wisdom, Gratitude, Empowering women, Attitude, Writing, D.G. Kaye

aging-and-wisdom-by-debby-giesA beautiful post by D.G. Kaye on the importance of gratitude in attaining wisdom as we grow older… ❤ 

THE VALUE OF #GRATITUDE – Voices of Wisdom Guest Post |D.G. Kaye

Source: Aging and wisdom, Gratitude, Empowering women, Attitude, Writing, D.G. Kaye

Today I’m sharing a recent article I was invited to write and share on Dorothy Sander’s blog, Aging Abundantly.

Dorothy writes about the wisdom we gain as we age. And her new series, which I was thrilled to be the first in, is entitled ‘The Voices of Wisdom’ – The Value of Gratitude.

Read the article below and you can continue reading on Dorothy’s blog.

Wisdom comes with the ability to be still. Just look and just listen. No more is needed. Being still, looking, and listening activates the non-conceptual intelligence within you. Let stillness direct your words and actions. ECKHART TOLLE

I’m so happy to introduce Debby Gies, our first contributor to the The Voices of Wisdom Series.  Debby, an author and prolific writer, captured my attention somewhere in cyberspace.  I  was drawn to her enthusiasm for life and read her book, Conflicted Hearts, a memoir in which her strength and courage is made visible and her zest for life contagious.

The Voices of Wisdom series is an ongoing series featuring guest posts by women of wisdom. Each guest will share some piece of wisdom gleaned from their life challenges. Stay tuned. We have more captivating reads ahead!

My Journey Through Mid-Life and What I Learned By Debby Gies

Have you ever been on a ride that was completely smooth – no bumps, no valleys, and no inclines? I can say with certainty that I haven’t, and naturally, my journey through mid-life was no exception.

When I was young, I thought I was invincible. My plans to battle age developed decades before I hit my mid-life years. My arsenal of age-fighters were nothing short of trying to maintain a healthy eating and exercise regime, and an ongoing supply of whatever beauty aids, creams, potions, and lotions I would read about, in efforts to preserve myself from aging.

But the truth is, aging is a natural process of life. And, it entails much more than just our physical attributes. As I transitioned into my middle years, many things changed. My perceptions and values changed, my evaluations on friendships changed, even my tolerances and gratitudes changed.

Time became more apparent; not all of these things happened simultaneously, but as the hands of time began pointing in the direction of fifty, I noticed several changes within myself.

I BECAME MORE AWARE OF PASSING TIME

Although the healthy measures I adapted to when I was younger were moderately paying off, staving off wrinkles as best I could, my attitude towards life in general had changed.

I became a lot more aware of how quickly the days were passing, and how illness can change life in a flash. And I became concerned about the fact that I hadn’t accomplished anything that made me feel like I would be leaving my footprints behind when it came time for me to go to the next world. I felt time closing in on me. Continue Reading . . .

Source: THE VALUE OF GRATITUDE – Voices of Wisdom Guest Post |