Category Archives: Nutrition

Smorgasbord Christmas Party -Food and Drink – Dinner for the fur family.

Oh, the goosebumps … and the tears ~ of joy. Sally Cronin‘s post on feeding our fur families is exquisite. She includes multiple tips and links, as well as some delicious-sounding homemade recipes. The clincher, however, is the video. Thirty homeless fur balls are given a holiday feast, and several are adopted; the perfect critter holiday video   

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Smorgasbord Christmas PartyThis is an updated post from a year ago today with new videos and information.

Apart from the recipes there are some health issues that are important if you are not going to have sick pets during the holidays. Many human foods, especially packaged full of chemicals can be very harmful.

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During our thousands of years of our relationship with dogs up to around 30 years ago, pets were fed on scraps from our own dinner. Then the billion dollar a year pet food industry was born…. and the majority of our domestic dogs and cats went from eating natural food to dry pellets. (Almost 24 Billion dollars in the US alone!).  http://www.americanpetproducts.org/press_industrytrends.asp

I appreciate that most of the animal foods available today may be touted as being rich in nutrients and full of vitality but I am afraid that I steer clear of dried food and its additives…

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Smorgasbord Health A-Z of Common Conditions – Acne

Sally Cronin has started a new series on her blog: A-Z of Common Conditions. As a nutritional therapist, she is a wealth of knowledge. If you would like her to highlight a particular ailment, drop by her blog and leave your request in a comment. I know she would love to hear from you, and the more requests she gets for a particular topic, the more likely she is to write about it ❤

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The start of a new series with the A – Z of common conditions.  Some posts will be new and others will recycle previous posts with any relevant updates.  I have received several emails in the last couple of months about acneand so I am posting the article from April again.

Acne is the curse of the teen years and also as we go through hormonal changes later in life.. There is also a strong link to diet, especially the the over indulgence in sugars.

Some organs play a major role in our survival and others can be removed without impacting our general health in any significant way. As we have evolved, so an organ’s function may have changed to accommodate our modern environment, especially if their role is protective as in the case of the liver and the elimination of toxins. In this polluted world our body is…

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Book Review: Size Matters by Sally Cronin

book-sally-size-mattersPublished  15 August 2016   Amazon

Size Matters is Sally Georgina Cronin’s no-holds-barred, true-life story of her journey from near-death obesity to vibrant health.

I first was struck by the author’s willingness to share so many personal things that most of us would hold to dearly as private; things that would humiliate us; things that we’d be hard-pressed to look in the mirror and admit even to ourselves. I knew that anyone willing to bridge this gap must be someone with integrity and a deep concern for her fellow human beings.

I didn’t have to go far into the book to find the encouragement I needed. The last paragraph of chapter one said it all for me:       “What began as a painful journey into my past became an exciting adventure in the present with expectations of a much brighter future.” Above all else, I wanted a bright future. And Ms. Cronin’s approach proffered that hope.

I’m not going to detail the specifics of this book, because a peek inside on Amazon will show you the table of contents and highlight the details of the program she developed.

What I want to shine a light on is the inspiration she exemplifies and sallyoffers to all those battling a weight problem. She knew that almost any help given by the medical/scientific/etc. communities would offer template approaches to weight reduction, approaches that she and many others have tried and failed at miserably. Because her health was in such jeopardy, she needed not only to urgently change her eating habits, but also to have the results be permanent. Thus began her journey within and her search for a sustainable healthy future.

It’s difficult enough to put one foot in front of the other on a daily basis in this fast-paced technological age. Everyone is multi-tasking and running fast to stand still. So when we find ourselves faced with a life-threatening condition, fear leads us to seek a quick fix. But quick fixes are almost never permanent and almost always detrimental. The author recognized this and strove instead to find her own way back home to herself.

Although despairing and contemplating suicide, she reached deep inside and found a way to kindle her common sense, which provided the ladder needed to climb out of the pit into which she’d dug herself. Admitting her weaknesses and acknowledging her strengths, she put the totality of herself into turning her life around. Plying patience and dogged determination, she climbed out of the suffocating abyss and surfaced into the fresh air of a promising and vibrant life.

sally-10I have never been obese, but I have carried extra weight at different times throughout my life. Taking off 10 or 15 pounds is hard enough. I can only imagine the devastation one must feel when facing the necessity of a 150-pound weight reduction. And I use the word “reduction” rather than “loss,” because I think the mind always seeks to find that which has been lost.

In my opinion, this book is not only a comprehensive text for permanent weight reduction, but also a “how to” guide for breaking the shackles of destructive behavior and tenaciously moving forward.

When asked in grade school to name five people who inspire us, most children look to either their families or noted figures in the world. And yet there are so many working humbly behind the global scenes who seek neither notoriety nor acclaim. I believe they’re referred to as unsung heroes.

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This review is as much an acknowledgement of the author’s positive contribution to the world as it is of her all-inclusive approach to weight reduction in this outstanding book, which I highly recommend. Lose an ounce of weight, gain a pound of self-confidence. Sally Cronin is an inspirational example for all.

Sally’s Links:     Website      Facebook      Twitter       LinkedIn                                                          Google+      Amazon

Smorgasbord Health – Food in the News – You probably do not want to read this.

Do you REALLY know what’s in your food? Did you ever consider that it might contain anti-freeze, human hair, or beavers’ scent sacs, just to name a few of the horrendous ingredients in industrialized food? The corporate food industry is literally allowed to get away with murder, because consistently eating these foods leads to a multitude of diseases that eventually kill us. Sally Cronin has a very enlightening post on her blog today, and it would behoove all of us to take note. “An estimated 75% of diseases that kill us prematurely are lifestyle related . . . It is about the nature of the food we consume.”

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There are some articles on food studies that I just gloss over to be honest as they are usually funded by parties with an invested interest. In recent years the sugar cartels have been very active as are the meat and grain consortiums.

However, one area that I am definitely interested in is industrialised food. I avoid the term processed food because some of our natural products will go through some form of processing to reach our tables.. dairy products for example.

However, industrially produced food is a very different beast and that is because it is usually more man-made than naturally sourced. Over the years governments have forced food manufacturers to add more and more to the labels until it has become a farce. Apart from needing a visit to an optician for bottle top glasses to read the print, you need a degree in chemistry to identify…

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Smorgasbord Health – A close encounter with a silent killer – Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

Carbon monoxide (CO) exposure is the leading cause of poison-related deaths in the U.S. Sally Cronin discusses this silent killer and relates a trying and near fatal personal experience. Here are a few more articles you might find helpful: http://www.bestheating.com/thesilentkiller, https://www.americannursetoday.com/carbon-monoxide-poisoning-silent-killer/, https://www.health.ny.gov/publications/2826.pdf.

Women’s Health Week Revisited – The progresson of Osteoporosis over 50.

Maintaining bone health can be a challenge, especially as we age. Vitamins K and D3 play a vital role, along with daily exercise. Visit Sally’s blog to learn what you can include in your diet and exercise routine to promote healthy bones…

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Over the last few posts I have covered most of the stages in a woman’s life by looking at the phases in our reproductive cycle from conception through to menopause. I also wrote about the endocrine system and hormones whose protection does decrease as we get into our 50s and 60s. Without adequate nutrition and exercise, our skeleton too begins to weaken. As our bones become less dense we are at risk of fractures and loss of joint flexibility. Osteoporosis is more prevalent in women than men but affects both.

Statistics for Osteoporosis

Worldwide, osteoporosis causes more than 8.9 million fractures annually, resulting in an osteoporotic fracture every 3 seconds.

Osteoporosis is estimated to affect 200 million women worldwide – approximately one-tenth of women aged 60, one-fifth of women aged 70, two-fifths of women aged 80 and two-thirds of women aged 90.

Osteoporosis affects an estimated 75 million people in…

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The Medicine Woman’s Larder – Mushrooms – The Egyptians believed they granted immortality

Sally Cronin regularly shares her vast knowledge of nutrition in her ongoing Medicine Woman’s Larder series. Today’s post covers the many varieties of mushroom and their medicinal properties…

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According to the ancient Egyptians, over 4,000 years ago, eating mushrooms granted you immortality. The pharaohs even went as far as to ban commoners from eating these delicious fungi but it was probably more to guarantee that they received an ample supply. Mushrooms have played a large role in the diet of many cultures and there is evidence that 3,000 years ago certain varieties of mushrooms were used in Chinese medicine and they still play a huge role in Chinese cuisine today.

There are an estimated 20,000 varieties of mushrooms growing around the modern world, with around 2,000 being edible. Of these, over 250 types of mushroom have been recognised as being medically active or therapeutic.

More and more research is indicating that certain varieties have the overwhelming potential to cure cancer and AIDS and in Japan some of the extracts from mushrooms are already being used in mainstream medicine.

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Medicine Woman’s Larder – Green Tea – One small leaf with terrific health benefits.

Sally Cronin discusses the myriad benefits of green tea, which are innumerable. Most likely every one of us could benefit from drinking it daily …

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Medicine Womans larder

All true teas – not herbal tisanes or infusions are made from the Camellia Sinensis. These plants grow in warm climates with the very best teas coming from the highest altitudes – at that level the plant leaves are slower to mature and this means that they have a much richer flavour. Although the plants all come from the same strain – Camellia Sinensis – different growing conditions such as altitude, climate and soil will affect the flavour of the tea.

It is when the processing takes place that the difference appears between black and green teas. There is in fact another tea in the middle of these two, which is a greenish brown colour and is called oolong tea.

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Green tea is the least processed of the three and therefore retains nearly all its nutritional content. One particular antioxidant which is called a Catechin (epigallocatechin-3-gallate EGCG for short) is…

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