Tag Archives: Diet and Lifestyle

Smorgasbord Health – Food in the News – You probably do not want to read this.

Do you REALLY know what’s in your food? Did you ever consider that it might contain anti-freeze, human hair, or beavers’ scent sacs, just to name a few of the horrendous ingredients in industrialized food? The corporate food industry is literally allowed to get away with murder, because consistently eating these foods leads to a multitude of diseases that eventually kill us. Sally Cronin has a very enlightening post on her blog today, and it would behoove all of us to take note. “An estimated 75% of diseases that kill us prematurely are lifestyle related . . . It is about the nature of the food we consume.”

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

smorgasbord health

There are some articles on food studies that I just gloss over to be honest as they are usually funded by parties with an invested interest. In recent years the sugar cartels have been very active as are the meat and grain consortiums.

However, one area that I am definitely interested in is industrialised food. I avoid the term processed food because some of our natural products will go through some form of processing to reach our tables.. dairy products for example.

However, industrially produced food is a very different beast and that is because it is usually more man-made than naturally sourced. Over the years governments have forced food manufacturers to add more and more to the labels until it has become a farce. Apart from needing a visit to an optician for bottle top glasses to read the print, you need a degree in chemistry to identify…

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Smorgasbord Health – A close encounter with a silent killer – Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

Carbon monoxide (CO) exposure is the leading cause of poison-related deaths in the U.S. Sally Cronin discusses this silent killer and relates a trying and near fatal personal experience. Here are a few more articles you might find helpful: http://www.bestheating.com/thesilentkiller, https://www.americannursetoday.com/carbon-monoxide-poisoning-silent-killer/, https://www.health.ny.gov/publications/2826.pdf.

Women’s Health Week Revisited – The progresson of Osteoporosis over 50.

Maintaining bone health can be a challenge, especially as we age. Vitamins K and D3 play a vital role, along with daily exercise. Visit Sally’s blog to learn what you can include in your diet and exercise routine to promote healthy bones…

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

women

Over the last few posts I have covered most of the stages in a woman’s life by looking at the phases in our reproductive cycle from conception through to menopause. I also wrote about the endocrine system and hormones whose protection does decrease as we get into our 50s and 60s. Without adequate nutrition and exercise, our skeleton too begins to weaken. As our bones become less dense we are at risk of fractures and loss of joint flexibility. Osteoporosis is more prevalent in women than men but affects both.

Statistics for Osteoporosis

Worldwide, osteoporosis causes more than 8.9 million fractures annually, resulting in an osteoporotic fracture every 3 seconds.

Osteoporosis is estimated to affect 200 million women worldwide – approximately one-tenth of women aged 60, one-fifth of women aged 70, two-fifths of women aged 80 and two-thirds of women aged 90.

Osteoporosis affects an estimated 75 million people in…

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The Medicine Woman’s Larder – Mushrooms – The Egyptians believed they granted immortality

Sally Cronin regularly shares her vast knowledge of nutrition in her ongoing Medicine Woman’s Larder series. Today’s post covers the many varieties of mushroom and their medicinal properties…

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

Medicine Womans larder

According to the ancient Egyptians, over 4,000 years ago, eating mushrooms granted you immortality. The pharaohs even went as far as to ban commoners from eating these delicious fungi but it was probably more to guarantee that they received an ample supply. Mushrooms have played a large role in the diet of many cultures and there is evidence that 3,000 years ago certain varieties of mushrooms were used in Chinese medicine and they still play a huge role in Chinese cuisine today.

There are an estimated 20,000 varieties of mushrooms growing around the modern world, with around 2,000 being edible. Of these, over 250 types of mushroom have been recognised as being medically active or therapeutic.

More and more research is indicating that certain varieties have the overwhelming potential to cure cancer and AIDS and in Japan some of the extracts from mushrooms are already being used in mainstream medicine.

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Medicine Woman’s Larder – Green Tea – One small leaf with terrific health benefits.

Sally Cronin discusses the myriad benefits of green tea, which are innumerable. Most likely every one of us could benefit from drinking it daily …

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Medicine Womans larder

All true teas – not herbal tisanes or infusions are made from the Camellia Sinensis. These plants grow in warm climates with the very best teas coming from the highest altitudes – at that level the plant leaves are slower to mature and this means that they have a much richer flavour. Although the plants all come from the same strain – Camellia Sinensis – different growing conditions such as altitude, climate and soil will affect the flavour of the tea.

It is when the processing takes place that the difference appears between black and green teas. There is in fact another tea in the middle of these two, which is a greenish brown colour and is called oolong tea.

green tea

Green tea is the least processed of the three and therefore retains nearly all its nutritional content. One particular antioxidant which is called a Catechin (epigallocatechin-3-gallate EGCG for short) is…

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