Tag Archives: Food

Food in Fiction – Part 4 – Guest Post…

Christine Campbell brings us Part 4 of Food in Fiction as a guest on The Story Reading Ape. Christine’s novels tend to feature food. Yet even if our novels don’t, she suggests at least deciding what and where our characters like to eat, in order to enhance their reader appeal. Good advice! Hop over to Chris’ blog for the full story …

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

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In this, the fourth and last article on the topic of Food in Fiction, I thought I’d let you into a badly kept secret.

Having been married since forever and having brought up a family of five, I can cook – but I wouldn’t say I was good at it. Perhaps that’s why none of the main characters in my novels have been great cooks. I’ve had my share of disasters too, though not ever on the scale of Hugh’s in my WIP, For What it’s Worth.

By the time she turned into the communal stair of the flats, Sandra had built up a fair head of steam in her boiler, fuelled by the indignity she suffered at work set against the memory of Hugh lying warm and sleepy in their bed when she left him this morning and sitting with his feet on the coffee table all day…

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Food in Fiction – Part 2 – Guest Post…

Christine Campbell brings us Part 2 of Food in Fiction as a guest on The Story Reading Ape blog. Food as an element in novels has tantalized readers across the ages, as it engages all of the senses. Hop over to Chris’ blog and read this fascinating article…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

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Food can play many different roles in fiction writing. It can set a scene, tell much about a character, even become a player in the story. Since it’s important to engage as many of the reader’s senses as possible, food can be a very useful tool in the author’s toolbox since food description can involve sight, sound, texture, taste and smell – all five of the senses. A real bargain package.

According to The Good Food Guide:

“Childrens literature makes for rich pickings when it comes to culinary descriptions: theres moment after juicy moment in Dahls Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, or James and The Giant Peach.

The description of Amys ‘pickled limesin Louisa May Alcotts Little Women – ‘plump and juicy’ in their moist, brown-paper parcelwith their delicious…

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Smorgasbord Health – Food in the News – You probably do not want to read this.

Do you REALLY know what’s in your food? Did you ever consider that it might contain anti-freeze, human hair, or beavers’ scent sacs, just to name a few of the horrendous ingredients in industrialized food? The corporate food industry is literally allowed to get away with murder, because consistently eating these foods leads to a multitude of diseases that eventually kill us. Sally Cronin has a very enlightening post on her blog today, and it would behoove all of us to take note. “An estimated 75% of diseases that kill us prematurely are lifestyle related . . . It is about the nature of the food we consume.”

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

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There are some articles on food studies that I just gloss over to be honest as they are usually funded by parties with an invested interest. In recent years the sugar cartels have been very active as are the meat and grain consortiums.

However, one area that I am definitely interested in is industrialised food. I avoid the term processed food because some of our natural products will go through some form of processing to reach our tables.. dairy products for example.

However, industrially produced food is a very different beast and that is because it is usually more man-made than naturally sourced. Over the years governments have forced food manufacturers to add more and more to the labels until it has become a farce. Apart from needing a visit to an optician for bottle top glasses to read the print, you need a degree in chemistry to identify…

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The Medicine Woman’s Larder – Mushrooms – The Egyptians believed they granted immortality

Sally Cronin regularly shares her vast knowledge of nutrition in her ongoing Medicine Woman’s Larder series. Today’s post covers the many varieties of mushroom and their medicinal properties…

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

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According to the ancient Egyptians, over 4,000 years ago, eating mushrooms granted you immortality. The pharaohs even went as far as to ban commoners from eating these delicious fungi but it was probably more to guarantee that they received an ample supply. Mushrooms have played a large role in the diet of many cultures and there is evidence that 3,000 years ago certain varieties of mushrooms were used in Chinese medicine and they still play a huge role in Chinese cuisine today.

There are an estimated 20,000 varieties of mushrooms growing around the modern world, with around 2,000 being edible. Of these, over 250 types of mushroom have been recognised as being medically active or therapeutic.

More and more research is indicating that certain varieties have the overwhelming potential to cure cancer and AIDS and in Japan some of the extracts from mushrooms are already being used in mainstream medicine.

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